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New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

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  • New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

    Hi Folks, lots of big changes in my life lately! I have recently quit my day job to help set in motion our objectives of simplifying our lives as much as we can. We both have some entrepreneurial interests and don't have kids, so we've decided to take the plunge and make an effort at doing our own thing. Lots more to that story, but for this forum, a couple of things of interest. Probably no surprise, I am interested in taking my woodworking hobby to a more serious level and using it as a source of income. I am also very interested in timberframe construction. I've been studying it independently for some time but have also taken Steve Chappel's course (Fox Maple School of Traditional Building) in introductory and advanced timberframing. I've built a few little things but over the next little while will be building a new shop which will serve as both a timberframing shop AND my woodworking shop. So logically, the shop will be timberframed and serve not only to refine and hone my skills as a timberframer, but it will also serve to show potential clients different framing techniques, different styles and the look of different species of wood. It will also make one beautiful woodworking shop!

    So, I'd like to gauge the interest in seeing the build documented. Even though my wife is still working for a while, we still have to be very cost conscious and I am going to be doing a lot myself and would be happy to take the time to document my approach if folks are interested. Some things I'll be doing (or have done) and can discuss or just show:

    - Shop/structure design
    - Tree harvesting/yarding (I told you I'm doing lots myself! I cut most of the trees myself this winter!)
    - log milling (some logs are longer than the mill, so a bit of a learning experience there)
    - log and board storage and seasoning
    - machining of Oak T&G flooring
    - machining of pine T&G sheathing
    - Frame cutting (my approach to joinery cutting etc)
    - frame assembly
    - etc etc etc....

    We are almost finished the milling so can still take more pics if people are interested in seeing lots of those.

    Cheers,

    Brent
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club.
  • Thread Continues Below...

  • #2

    Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

    Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

    Document away, we love pictures and videos. Best of luck on your new venture.
    Steve The Drill Sergeant
    Check out MyShopNotes on YouTube.

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

      Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

      Please do a shop build thread. Mine's just about wrapped up and we need another ground-up build going!
      Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

        Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

        Definitely.
        That's a story I'll be sure to follow.

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

          Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

          I would like to see it!
          Don't trust everything you see on Holmes on Homes;
          http://forum.canadianwoodworking.com...lems-with-them

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

            Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

            Very interested in following this thread,Brent
            All the best and good luck

            Comment

            • Thread Continues Below...

            • #7

              Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

              Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

              To bad you arn't closer. I would love to help you do the raising.

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                Yes please - show and tell. I love timber-framed anything. Wish I could do the house over again.
                Nothing is ever as straightforward as it seems.

                Glenn from Winnipeg

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                  Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                  Wow Brent this is going to be interesting. I built a cottage for a friend up North a few years ago using a combinaion of timber frame and conventionel walls. Your shop is going to be quite nice. Good luck to you and your wife.

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                    Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                    OK folks, with the feedback above and a bunch of additional PMs it seems lots of folks are interested so I'll get down to it. I'm actually hauling the last of the fresh cut beams home today for storage, and will work away steadily at the boards over the next little while. So here's a bit more information as a teaser before I get to pictures:

                    The shop will be (exterior dimensions) 24' by 40', two story, fully timber framed from sills to rafters with insulation outside of the beams so all of the joinery and beams will be visible from the inside. The style is called a "High Posted Cape" and is based on the one in Steve Chappell's book if anyone has it, though I've modified it a fair bit. Joinery will be secured and fastened with oak pegs only. The main structural members will be 8x10 solid Eastern White Pine (posts, rafters and wall plates) and the 24' tie beams will be solid 8x12. Braces will be mainly red oak and white ash 4"x8" to allow for curves to be cut in them, with some 4"x5" left rectangular. The second floor will have a sloping ceiling, but a 4' knee wall so lots of usable space up there. We will live in the upstairs for a while until we build the house, after which the second floor will be either a studio area, or a reduced dust area for finishing etc....or both. The structure will be 4 "bents" and therefore three bays with the first two 12' and the last one 16'. The last one will allow me to bring the tractor or other vehicles inside for maintenance in the winter if needed so I can work on it in a warm place, though we will have a covered and semi enclosed tractor shed where it will live most of the time.

                    The downside of having a dual purpose building (woodworking and timberframing shop) is that I will have to keep all the machines on wheels so I can shove many of them to one side when I need to bring a stack of beams inside for a timber framing job. I'm sure I'll find a scenario/layout where I can keep this to a minimum though and it won't be the end of the world.

                    All for now. I'm building a 3D rendering of the shop in Sketchup which I hope to share soon so you can visualize, but I'll be back with pictures in a bit.

                    Cheers and thanks for the interest.

                    Brent
                    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club.

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                      Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                      Ok, so here goes!

                      This frame was engineered for White Pine and since pine was relatively available to me and I like the look of it in a frame, I chose to use pine as the primary species in the frame. The below pic is a close approximation of the 24x24 part of my frame, except that my timbers are slightly heavier (8x10 instead of 7x10 for posts and rafters, and 8x12 for tie beams) since I will be using rough sawn timbers and prefer the look of those proportions. My design will have one more bay off the back which is 16', and I have elected to increase the height of the first floor ceiling so I can easily stand 8' lumber/sheet goods on end. Probably more importantly, I will only have one post on the bottom floor instead of two, leaving fewer obstructions down there. I'll finish and post my final design later on.
                      Click image for larger version

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                      Once I decided on the basic design of the shop, I could start cutting some logs for the basic framing members. Did I mention I was going to do everything myself? Here are a few pics of trees we chose to cut.

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                      Below is my wife hugging the first tree we cut.

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                      The below was quite a nice tree I got a 24' tie beam out of. Not very big necessarily but nice and straight with only a little backwards lean.

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                      Since the snow would melt before we could get them out, we put small logs underneath the timbers so they would be up off the ground when the snow disappeared. Makes it much easier to get a choker around the log when it comes time to yard it out.
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                      So for those who aren't familiar with white pine, there is a real risk of "sap stain" which needs to be managed. Some general guidelines that help reduce the likelihood of getting it include cutting the trees while still frozen, milling ASAP and giving the boards and timbers a quick dry shortly after milling, but not for too long as the boards and timbers need to dry slow enough to limit checking. For my timbers (and the boards you inevitably get around the timbers in a log) I have had no blue sap stain at all by following these guidelines. I also used the end sealer from Lee Valley on all timbers shortly after felling and the checking is certainly limited.

                      All for now!

                      B
                      Last edited by timberframe; 05-31-2014, 11:59 AM.
                      Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club.

                      Comment

                      • Thread Continues Below...

                      • #12

                        Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                        Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                        Just a few more of the logging process and some thoughts or things I learned.

                        I've done lots of semi commercial logging before, mainly with horses but a bit for farm tractor/winch as well, but I've done very little cutting to make large beams. So when you're choosing trees, it takes a little while to calibrate your eye so you can anticipate what you are going to get from the tree. Of course it can all get thrown out if you get it down and find that the tree is rotten in the middle etc, but I really enjoyed this phase of the project. I went to the woods every day with a list of timber requirements and aimed to cut the most difficult ones (the largest and longest beams) first to guarantee I got them and then just checked them off as I bucked up the trees. I deliberately cut a couple of extras for the important ones just in case. What's neat about cutting for timber framing is you are already thinking about cutting joints when you are looking at a standing tree. Cutting joints around a cluster of knots for example is a real PITA so I would shift my bucking location up or down the log by a foot or so just to make my life easier down the road. Grain runout is not preferred, so if you end up with off-centre hearts you might decide something different for that log once it's down. It's a lot to keep track of actually, so you have to be organized unless you're in a position to just cut a million logs and choose down the road. A few pics:

                        The below was destined to be a tie beam but when we got it down you can see there was some rot in the log. In the end I cut it as a tie beam anyway to serve as my extra, and I cut it a little long so I could trim off the bottom, hoping the rot hole didn't go too far.

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                        Just a couple shots of me pretending to be a logger:

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                        The below log sort of saved my day. We had a rough day in the woods (stinking cold, tons of snow, a couple of rotten trees etc) and this tree salvaged it. It wasn't really large, but was perfectly sound, had a nicely centred pith, and quite straight and I got three important members out of it and another decent log for boards! Over 50' of wood!

                        Click image for larger version

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                        All for now,

                        B
                        Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club.

                        Comment


                        • #13

                          Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                          Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                          So I needed some brace stock and was going to cut some ash to go along with the ash I milled last year when I heard about someone who had just cut a couple of oak trees for firewood that might be better used as braces. A deal was struck and the ash trees got to live another day. Here are some of them logs I salvaged. Felt good to put them to a better purpose than the fire pit. As a bonus of course, I got piles of oak boards too!

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                          B
                          Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club.

                          Comment


                          • #14

                            Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                            Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                            This looks to be a very interesting build. Can't wait for more.
                            Me: How do you spell “apathy”?
                            Reply: Who cares!

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                            • #15

                              Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                              Re: New Shop Build Thread - A Timberframed Woodworking Shop

                              So the landowner with a larger tractor pulled out a bunch of the larger logs in the snow, and then I finished the job with the little Kubota. Overall quite uneventful as the woodlot was mostly flat and quite open. We used the lift with the 3PT drawbar as much as we could to keep the logs off of the ground to protect the woodlot and keep the logs from getting too dirty. For the most part the milling of the logs was pretty straightforward without much adventure. Below is the first timber milled, one of the 8x10 exterior posts:

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                              The real adventure began when we had to mill the long tie beams. They are called tie beams because they tie the outside of the walls together, and keep the lateral thrust from the rafters from pushing the walls outwards. As you can imagine there are many different forms or techniques in timber framing, but in this frame I wanted to use uninterrupted or continuous tie beams which meant (if I wanted a building wider than the mill's capacity of around 20 feet) I needed to cut longer than the mill could do in one pass, and figure out with the sawyer how to mill them. There are bed extensions for the mill you can buy, but unless you are planning on doing a lot of them, it's not a worthwhile investment. So here's how we did it:

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                              It's best to load the log with the heavy (butt) end NOT hanging off the far end of the mill. These 25 foot logs were extending off the end enough that they wanted to tip off when turning, so after the first one, we reoriented them to always have butt end towards the carriage.

                              The objective is to get four sides with at least 8" of flat on it. It doesn't have to be your final dimensions, but having the flat sides makes it so much easier to manage down the line. So we would run the saw down the mill as far as we could, then back it out, tap some felling wedges into the kerf and cut off the slab as far towards the end of the cut as we could. We would then roll the log 90degrees and repeat until we had 4 sides flattened off:

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                              We would then lift the log on the two toe boards (which conveniently are rollers) and roll the log down the mill as far as required, set it back down on the bunk, drop the blade back down to where the last cut was and run it through. That was repeated for times till we had a 4 sided cant. Then, for every board we got outside of the timber itself, we had to essentially repeat that process. Quite time consuming, but after I paid for the logs and $55/hr for the mill, it was still cheaper than buying the timbers!

                              This is one of the tie beam timbers on the mill in the end:
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                              If you have any questions or want more detail, let me know!

                              B
                              Last edited by timberframe; 06-03-2014, 01:54 PM.
                              Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club.

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