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  • Dust Collection for New Hobbyist?

    I am starting to built out a small shop in my 2 car garage. I have a table saw, jointer, planer, mitre saw and a bunch of hand tools at this point.

    I was searching Kijiji for some dust collectors and found one that I've never seen before -- was curious about its abilities. Anyone ever use one like this?

    http://www.kijiji.ca/v-power-tool/ba...ationFlag=true

    Worth checking out, or perhaps stick to a more traditional Craftex model or similar?

    Thanks for any advice.
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  • #2

    Re: Dust Collection for New Hobbyist?

    1 hp is pretty small, I think 2 hp should be your minimum.
    But I'm not overly familiar with that style, you don't see them very often. If they're not popular than it might be for a reason.

    Nathan

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    • #3

      Re: Dust Collection for New Hobbyist?

      Hi Mike, my first piece of advice would be don't buy any bag type collector.

      My second piece of advice would be to make a drawing of what you want your shop to look like in 5 to 10 years. This will allow you to decide if you can live with a portable unit, or want something better such as a cyclone with a HEPA filter.

      Note that if you can exhaust the air outside, and don't have neighbours close you can use an extractor with poor filtering, or even no filtering in the case of a 2 stage unit such as a cyclone.

      My third piece of advice is that unless you're buying from a manufacturer that specializes in dust extraction, divide their performance numbers by 2 or 3 to get actual performance.

      To collect fine dust from a table saw for example, you'll need 400 to 600 CFM at the cabinet, and 100 to 200 CFM over the blade. That's 500 to 800 CFM, not the 400 CFM you'll see for just collecting some of the big chips.

      Welcome to the forum......................Regards, Rod.
      Work is the curse of the riding class.

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      • #4

        Re: Dust Collection for New Hobbyist?

        Welcome to the forum, it's a tricky question and like Rod said you have to look into the future with machines and layout. The dust collector you posted is not terribly good, a one machine at a time collector, but the other way to look at it is it's better than nothing and upgrade in a few years when you know more.
        The Heath question is well written about, there is lots of fine particles generated in the air, this should be taken care of, a good dust mask and air filtration system if the primary dust collector does not capture it.
        Cheers, Mark
        sigpicToday's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut, that held its ground.

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        • #5

          Re: Dust Collection for New Hobbyist?

          Thanks for all the good advice. I think I can justify $500-600 for one for the time being. I'm in a 2 car garage, with neighbors close by. I plan to really only take up 1 bay of the garage with the big tools and use the 2nd bay for an ad-hoc assembly area with a portable Paulk style work bench as needed. That means the table saw, mitre saw, jointer and planer will all be in close proximity. I don't imagine this setup changing dramatically in the coming years and this will always be a make shift shop -- If I move to a larger property with a dedicated shop, I'd have to re-evaluate tools,placement and a proper dust collection strategy then.

          I notice on Busy Bee's site for $599 and it seems like the canister filters are better than the bags.... any opinions on this unit? -- http://www.busybeetools.com/products...csa-cx400.html

          Thanks again for all the help

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          • #6

            Re: Dust Collection for New Hobbyist?

            The bag model of the Busy Bee collector you referenced is probably one of the most common collectors you will find in a hobby shop and the canister filter makes it superior to the bag for throughput.

            However, if you really want to get rid of the nasty stuff a filter capable of going down to about 0.3 micron is what you need and this puts you into the HEPA range. The 0.3 micron stuff is nasty because it easily lodges in the crevices of the lung tissue.

            Dust collecting is a matter of probability, no collector grabs everything so there will always be something floating around even if you can't see it, and that is the problem with fine dust.

            So you need a very fine filter such as a HEPA with a high throughput of air and this gets you into the more expensive cyclone territory. Nice to be able to blow the air outside but that can have effects on your heating bill in the winter since you will suck in cold air to make it up.

            Even though uncomfortable, a cheaper collector with a good respirator is an alternative and if you are young it should be considered since the nasty effects are cumulative and you aren't really invincible.

            billh

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            • Thread Continues Below...

            • #7

              Re: Dust Collection for New Hobbyist?

              It all depends on your expectations and concerns.

              I'm after chip collection and less fines. Others want to avoid breathing in any dust. To each their own, and no disrespect to them.

              Stating what you are after, might earn you more accurate advice. Some folks are happy with a broom.

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              • #8

                Re: Dust Collection for New Hobbyist?

                The motor on my Craftex collector lasted maybe 20 hrs. Just a warning.

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                • #9

                  Re: Dust Collection for New Hobbyist?

                  I have an older version of that one, with a bag top and bottom.
                  ive found it works fine in my 600 square ft shop.
                  i have very basic, short runs and then y splitters with shut offs.
                  I think it would be lacking with longer, more elaborate runs.
                  my longest is about 12 ft.

                  nathan

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                  • #10

                    Re: Dust Collection for New Hobbyist?

                    Considering your shop is attached to your house with your family in it I'd err on the side of caution with respect to safety unless you're comfortable deciding for them that fine dust described by Bill isn't something to worry about. You can consider a smaller, cheaper dust collector but I might suggest buying a used one, and then use the money you save to upgrade the filter to a HEPA cannister one. It's still going to have low suction and probably not get the dust at the tool, but you can wear a mask and leave the DC on for a while after you turn the tool off to clean the air. You can calculate the room volume and estimate the DC air volume/time to get a sense of how long to leave it on for.
                    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club.

                    http://www.youtube.com/c/DovetailTimberworks

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                    • #11

                      Re: Dust Collection for New Hobbyist?

                      I find it strange that a dust collector does not have a tefc motor

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                      • Thread Continues Below...

                      • #12

                        Re: Dust Collection for New Hobbyist?

                        I am with Kevin on this one. I started out with your typical 2 hp unit that I ran for about 20 years and it worked fine for a typical operation that you are describing. For years I had a table saw and jointer and no dust collection. You can upgrade the filter bags for the typical 2 bag, made in Asia collector. My neighbour has a used typical 2 bag collector for sale for $100. The others are all good ideas but my first car was a Volkswagen, not a Mercedes Benz.

                        Brian
                        Jerome, Kevin H and 2 others like this.
                        If your dreams don't scare you, you are not dreaming big enough

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                        • #13

                          Re: Dust Collection for New Hobbyist?

                          I'm sure, we who have some more fancy stuff, did start out with the Volkswagen model but I'm going to object a bit to the tone of some of the responses which indicate fine wood dust is no big deal. Actually, the no big deal is the annoying stuff on the floor and bench top.

                          Have a look at:

                          https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/woo..._wooddust.html

                          http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/pel88/wooddust.html

                          There are various nasty things that can happen from exposure to wood dust from dermatitis, asthma, prolonged colds and nasal cancer. The amount of exposure, type of wood and genetics will determine what happens but I do know of cases from other forums that hobbyist WWers have developed high sensitivity to wood and can only work well covered up and with a respirator.

                          Regardless of what we are prepared to do to deal with it, we should all be aware of what the real issue is and not having to sweep as much is not it.

                          billh

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                          • #14

                            Re: Dust Collection for New Hobbyist?

                            No doubt dust is a problem for some people. There are people that are allergic to peanuts, fish and a host of other things that occur in the environment. We all have different tolerances. One size does not fit all.

                            Brian
                            If your dreams don't scare you, you are not dreaming big enough

                            Comment


                            • #15

                              Re: Dust Collection for New Hobbyist?

                              That dust collector will work fine for the chips and some small, if in a couple of years your shop is still going upgrade.
                              Jerome
                              Canada's South Coast

                              Port Colborne On.
                              Every loaf of bread is a tragic tale of grains that could've become beer.......but didn't....

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