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  • iamtooler
    replied
    Originally posted by MartyFromKingston View Post
    I know that this is an old thread, however I still haven't got around to doing anything about my noisy DC.

    I thought that Allan's idea has a lot of potential for success, but don't like the idea of applying polyurethane foam directly to the fan enclosure - which in my case at least - is the culprit. So, here's what I've come up with to work in Allan's idea: wrap cardboard around the outside wall of my unit, focussing primarily on the impeller which as I stated is where the majority of the noise from my unit emanates from. I was thinking that enough layers of cardboard to make up 1" of thickness. I'd add the cardboard to all surfaces: the circular wall, top and bottom. Then I'd spray about 6" of expanding foam insulation to the cardboard, which should pretty well get rid of most of the sound. That way I wouldn't have to worry about eating into any more of my shop, nor worrying about the heat from the 3hp Baldor motor causing any problems. Perhaps as important, if this approach doesn't work out, then it'd be a relatively easy to remove everything back down to the original surface, because the cardboard wouldn't stick to the unit. Have you ever hear anyone else coming up with this approach, and if so, any thoughts as to how it may or may not work?

    
    Wrapping in cardboard seems cumbersome compared to using plastic bags, filled in situ?
    Rob

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  • Greg from K/W
    replied
    Some great ideas here guys. Thanks I will be using some of these to knock the noise level down on my compresor and dust collection too. Thanks a bunch.

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  • Rod Sheridan
    replied
    Hi, when I ran my Oneida cyclone with an internal filter, the turbulence of the exhaust air contributed to the noise.

    I installed the Oneida silencer and it reduced the noise by just over 3 dBA..................Regards, Rod.

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  • Bryan @ Woodstock
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	plenum-exhaust-silencer.jpg
Views:	241
Size:	9.0 KB
ID:	1168890 I wonder if you could make a silencer/muffler to install inline, sort of like a central vac muffler. It's just a plastic tube with a foam lining and it really cuts the noise of the Vac. My 3hp Oneida has a muffler sock that hangs inside the top of the filter to lessen noise. I see Oneida sells silencers. Diagram from Oneida.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	exhaust-silencer-cutaway-diagram.png Views:	1 Size:	11.2 KB ID:	1168888
    Last edited by Bryan @ Woodstock; 02-25-2018, 07:43 AM.

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  • RV Sam
    replied
    Got ya. The frequency also has a lot to do with it from what i understand. Roger that on the planer, some are like jet engines. That has a lot to do with the knifes also. Also have something on your bench all the time for the Boss and she will hear less, lol.

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  • MartyFromKingston
    replied
    Sam,

    I don't need to worry about my neighbours hearing anything from my shop, as we have an ICF and no shop noise can be heard outside our home. I always wear hearing protection whenever I'm running any machine in my shop.

    What I want to do is make it quieter for my spouse; even though we had sound-deadening foam sprayed in the ceiling of my shop, some noise does get through. And I'd like to reduce the noise volume as much as possible. Happy wife, happy life!!

    But here's an interesting point: since having replaced my Powermatic 15" planer with a vintage Bursgreen 18" planer last year, the planing noise dramatically lessened. I guess the much heavier castings and obviously better quality bearings and drive mechanism are the reason for this... but that's still the most noisy pair of machines in the shop.


    Originally posted by RV Sam View Post
    So is the noise you guys are worried about a neighbour thing ? Sure if you just turn on your inside DC it will be noisy but it is only on when you are standing inches away from the machine that is the reason for the DC in the first place so you should have muffs on anyway ???? What am i missing here ?

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  • RV Sam
    replied
    So is the noise you guys are worried about a neighbour thing ? Sure if you just turn on your inside DC it will be noisy but it is only on when you are standing inches away from the machine that is the reason for the DC in the first place so you should have muffs on anyway ???? What am i missing here ?

    Leave a comment:


  • MartyFromKingston
    replied
    I hear you (though not literally...) Erik! My intention is not to completely reduce the machine noise, as that'd be nearly impossible, but to bring it down a significant notch. Any my DC is a huge component of that.

    Leave a comment:


  • ErikM
    replied
    One of the advantages of a detached rural shop is you put the earmuffs on and ignore the noise, the disadvantage is if you get badly hurt nobody will hear you so you had best be able to dial 911 and deal with the bleeding alone. Between the RPC, DC and whatever machine I am using it is pretty noisy. When I had a basement shop I did a lot of work early in the morning if late at night with hand tools so the kids could sleep. The effort to make all the machine noise quiet enough so that ear protection is not required would be difficult and costly.

    Leave a comment:


  • MartyFromKingston
    replied
    I know that this is an old thread, however I still haven't got around to doing anything about my noisy DC.

    I thought that Allan's idea has a lot of potential for success, but don't like the idea of applying polyurethane foam directly to the fan enclosure - which in my case at least - is the culprit. So, here's what I've come up with to work in Allan's idea: wrap cardboard around the outside wall of my unit, focussing primarily on the impeller which as I stated is where the majority of the noise from my unit emanates from. I was thinking that enough layers of cardboard to make up 1" of thickness. I'd add the cardboard to all surfaces: the circular wall, top and bottom. Then I'd spray about 6" of expanding foam insulation to the cardboard, which should pretty well get rid of most of the sound. That way I wouldn't have to worry about eating into any more of my shop, nor worrying about the heat from the 3hp Baldor motor causing any problems. Perhaps as important, if this approach doesn't work out, then it'd be a relatively easy to remove everything back down to the original surface, because the cardboard wouldn't stick to the unit. Have you ever hear anyone else coming up with this approach, and if so, any thoughts as to how it may or may not work?

    
    Originally posted by Allan Cusworth View Post
    Has anyone any experience with wrapping the fan enclosure, or any other parts of the dust collector with polyurethane foam to reduce noise?

    Leave a comment:


  • MartyFromKingston
    replied
    Thanks for that extra bit of info, Rod. Hopefully I'll get around to finding some slack time in the shop after the "annual Christmas gifts sprint" is over!

    Originally posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Hi Marty, thanks for dropping off the particle counter last Friday, sorry I wasn't home so we could have a visit.

    If you make an enclosure that includes your filter, you will have to return air to the shop through a labyrinth or a pleated filter to reduce sound transmission.

    The enclosure will have the airflow of your collector flowing through it, more than enough airflow for motor cooling.

    If your motor has built in thermal protection, no modifications required, if the enclosure seems very hot (>40C) then you should relocate your magnetic starter to the interior of the enclosure so it's in the same environment as the motor...............Regards, Rod.

    Leave a comment:


  • Allan Cusworth
    replied
    Has anyone any experience with wrapping the fan enclosure, or any other parts of the dust collector with polyurethane foam to reduce noise?

    Leave a comment:


  • Greg Schlitt
    replied
    Big Tim, I don't have the means to measure air flow, but from what I can tell, there's been no reduction. Bringing Rod and MartyfromKings in on the discussion, all I did was cut a hole in the enclosure, in a somewhat out of the way place: I didn't pass the air through a baffle or anything (although doing that might well help the sound reduction more, but also reduce flow). The cross-sectional area of my circular 5" DC intake is roughly 3.1*2.5*2.5 approx 20 squares inches. The exit hole I cut is 5 by 5 so that's 25 square inches. Air in = air out so I figure that's more than enough to exhaust the air.

    And I agree with Rod, there's no concern about cooling because there's plenty of air flow through there: around 400 or 500 cfm passing through the enclosure, which is a lot more than the DC had just sitting there without an enclosure. If one were to run the DC with all the ports blocked then there could be a heat issue, yes. So don't do that!

    I can try to post some pics but I'm afraid there's not much to see and it's nothing I'm proud of, appearance wise. The DC sits in a shop corner, so I added one wall and then another wall which pivots as a door to form a rectangular closet.


    Staggered 2 by 3 studs between mounted between 2 by 4 plates on top and bottom, with Roxul sound insulation stuffed in. I did some caulking on joints with a sound insulation caulking but I'm not really sure that made a difference.

    I bet I could drive the sound down another few db with sufficient effort but I'm not sure it's worth it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rod Sheridan
    replied
    Hi Marty, thanks for dropping off the particle counter last Friday, sorry I wasn't home so we could have a visit.

    If you make an enclosure that includes your filter, you will have to return air to the shop through a labyrinth or a pleated filter to reduce sound transmission.

    The enclosure will have the airflow of your collector flowing through it, more than enough airflow for motor cooling.

    If your motor has built in thermal protection, no modifications required, if the enclosure seems very hot (>40C) then you should relocate your magnetic starter to the interior of the enclosure so it's in the same environment as the motor...............Regards, Rod.
    Last edited by Rod Sheridan; 09-20-2016, 07:21 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • MartyFromKingston
    replied
    Greg,

    I have been thinking of building some sort of enclosure, or perhaps installing sound-deadening panels, around my cyclone dust collector to bring down the noise level. However, one of the things that's holding me back - aside from trying to work it into my schedule (hey, I'm retired, what more can I say?!), is coming up with a design that accommodates my cyclone's Baldor 3hp motor, which generates a considerable amount of heat. I feel that if I enclose the motor (which really isn't the noise generator; it's the impeller that is causing the noise), I think that it may cause overheating problems.

    I'd therefore like to see some photos of what yours looks like, and to hear how you've provided for adequate ventilation of the motor in your design.

    Originally posted by Greg Schlitt View Post
    Some success, with data. Following Beakie I built a closet with staggered 2"x3" studs, drywall both sides and roxul insulation, with the same plan for the door. I was measuring 84 db before, now measuring around 65-67, so from "passing diesel truck" to "(noisy) dishwasher" according to some charts I've seen. Quite pleased, and I think I can probably make it a bit quieter with a bit more care.

    Of course when one is running machines, the machine noise will often be louder than the dust collector. But I like to run a sanding table for example (for the sake of my lungs) but at 87 db it was not bearable so I tended to turn the DC off. So both my lungs and ears are happy.

    Cheers, G.

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