Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New twist on a shop air cleaner

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New twist on a shop air cleaner

    Check out the latest addition to my shop to help filter dust generated when working on my lathe. Most air filters draw in dirty air through one or more filters and blow the clean air out an exhaust port. My design is similar in that it draws dirty air through a furnace filter to remove the large particles. Where it differs is that it blows the air out through a large pleated filter to remove the finest particles. This pleated filter is easier to clean than typical air cleaner filters and it has a very large surface area. It also acts as a diffuser so I don’t have a stream of air blowing any settled dust in the shop. I can’t take credit for this idea; it was suggested to me when I was talking to Dick Wynn at Wynn Environmental.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_0605.JPG
Views:	17
Size:	11.42 MB
ID:	1142349


    [IMG]file:///C:%5CUsers%5Cdavidbe%5CAppData%5CLocal%5CTemp%5Cms ohtmlclip1%5C01%5Cclip_image002.jpg[/IMG]I mounted a 3 speed furnace blower to a piece of ¾” thick plywood and then built the rest of the box with ½” plywood. The top is enclosed but the bottom is open and sized to fit a 20” by 25” furnace filter.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_0572.JPG
Views:	15
Size:	9.57 MB
ID:	1142350


    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_0584.JPG
Views:	17
Size:	9.82 MB
ID:	1142351


    The three speeds of the blower are controlled with three-way light switches and the main power is controlled with a timer so that I can leave the fan on for up to 4 hours after I leave the shop.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_0580.JPG
Views:	18
Size:	9.06 MB
ID:	1142352


    Here is a schematic of the wiring which is not complicated. You can see that the three way switches either supply power to the motor or supply power to the next switch. If more than one switch is in the up/on position, the highest selected speed is used.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	WiringDiagram.jpg
Views:	15
Size:	142.8 KB
ID:	1142353

    The pleated filter (9L300NANO from Wynn Environmental) has 300 square feet of surface area and can be cleaned with compressed air. The filter is mounted to a plywood plate which is then attached to the box with ¼”-20 bolts that thread into inserts in the box. The other end of the filter is closed with double-stick tape and a piece of 1/8” thick acrylic.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_0585.JPG
Views:	13
Size:	9.36 MB
ID:	1142354

    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_0593.JPG
Views:	13
Size:	9.61 MB
ID:	1142355


    The entire unit is held in place with the combination of a shelf and threaded eye bolts into the ceiling joists.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_0603.JPG
Views:	14
Size:	9.79 MB
ID:	1142356


    I have done some work on my lathe since installing the filter and there is a noticeable improvement in the amount of dust on the surrounding equipment. My Dylos particle counter also shows a reduced large and small particle count so the unit is working as expected.

    Thanks for looking.
    David


  • Thread Continues Below...

  • #2

    Re: New twist on a shop air cleaner

    Looks good,how loud is it?
    Im going to build a new one for my shop and these new ideas are great thanks.
    • “The greatest lesson in life is to know that even fools are right sometimes.”Winston Churchill

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: New twist on a shop air cleaner

      A couple of questions:

      1. How are you going to go about cleaning the filter? Seems like a chore to me. Wouldn't be a furnace style filter or series fo filters be a little more practical and as effective?
      2. Isn't it a part of the ambient air cleaner design to keep the particles agitated so that the stream of flowing air eventually redirects them into the air cleaner?

      I recently bought an air cleaner from the forum's member (excellent condition and awesome deal). The instructions call for installing the cleaner close to one of the long walls so that the air is circulated around the shop's perimieter. Gotta keep those particles air borne so they don't have the time to settle down, or only a small portion of dust would be caught.

      In my one car garage it takes less than 20 minutes and I can harldy see anything flying around anymore. Dust settling on objects is somewhere between minimal and nonexistent.
      In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: New twist on a shop air cleaner

        It is nice to filter the output as long as it does not decrease airflow to the point you actually clean less air.
        Rob

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: New twist on a shop air cleaner

          Stumpy nubs did something similar a couple years ago. He modified a commercial system.


          Comment


          • #6

            Re: New twist on a shop air cleaner

            Nice job, thanks for taking the time to post this, David.

            Comment

            • Thread Continues Below...

            • #7

              Re: New twist on a shop air cleaner

              Originally posted by redlee View Post
              Looks good,how loud is it?
              Im going to build a new one for my shop and these new ideas are great thanks.
              I don't find it that loud. It is quieter than the shop-built air cleaner I was using before this I built this one. I think the difference is because the large pleated filter acts as a diffuser for the exhaust air.

              David

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: New twist on a shop air cleaner

                Originally posted by darius View Post
                A couple of questions:

                1. How are you going to go about cleaning the filter? Seems like a chore to me. Wouldn't be a furnace style filter or series fo filters be a little more practical and as effective?
                2. Isn't it a part of the ambient air cleaner design to keep the particles agitated so that the stream of flowing air eventually redirects them into the air cleaner?

                I recently bought an air cleaner from the forum's member (excellent condition and awesome deal). The instructions call for installing the cleaner close to one of the long walls so that the air is circulated around the shop's perimieter. Gotta keep those particles air borne so they don't have the time to settle down, or only a small portion of dust would be caught.

                In my one car garage it takes less than 20 minutes and I can harldy see anything flying around anymore. Dust settling on objects is somewhere between minimal and nonexistent.
                The filter can be cleaned using compressed air - just like you would do for any pleated filter used with a dust collector. I could have used several furnace filters, but the surface area of this filter is much larger so it will take a lot longer to clog and it should filter out finer particles.

                You are correct that you want to keep the particles moving so you can filter them out. I suppose this is one drawback to this design, but there is still air movement since a lot of air is being drawn in to the unit. Even with the diffused output air, if I run the unit while I am working, I can see that the air quality is improving throughout the shop by looking at my Dylos particle counter. This unit was built primarily for my lathe and as I am sanding, I can see the dust travelling up to the input of the filter. I also notice a lot less settled dust around the lathe so I am pleased with the performance.

                David


                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: New twist on a shop air cleaner

                  Originally posted by iamtooler View Post
                  It is nice to filter the output as long as it does not decrease airflow to the point you actually clean less air.
                  Rob
                  With the square footage of this pleated filter, I don't see much of a decrease in the airflow with or without the filter installed. The furnace filter that acts as the first filter gets dirty pretty quickly while I am working on the lathe so I am more concerned about it decreasing the airflow as it gets clogged. Fortunately, those filters are cheap so I don't mind changing them as needed.

                  David

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X