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Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

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  • #46

    Re: Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

    Originally posted by Don Kondra View Post
    To cut the pipe I drill a 1/4" hole and then use a metal cutting blade in the jig saw...

    Cheers, Don
    Good suggestion, Don. I'll give that a try.
    David

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    • #47

      Re: Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

      Buy the shortest hacksaw blade you can get for your jig saw and it won't whip around.

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      • #48

        Re: Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

        Originally posted by al.m.. View Post
        I used a thin metal cutting disc on my5" angle grinder to cut spiral duct, then debarred with a file
        Al,
        Thanks for the suggestion. I don't have an angle grinder but I may need to get one if I get fed up with my jigsaw.
        David

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        • #49

          Re: Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

          Originally posted by DGB_WAT View Post
          snip...

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          ...snip

          Curious about the construction of your "wyes". Looks like they were custom made rather than stock items? The intersecting pieces appear to be just butted and spot soldered together but this surely can't be airtight? Is there more to it than meets the eye? I made my own that look very similar, but I soldered the entire intersection...

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          • #50

            Re: Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

            I am sure a little tin foil tape over that will make it air tight, might not look as nice as a clean nice solder all around but perhaps quicker and good enough
            Remember, we are here to share, learn, and enjoy. Relax.

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            • #51

              Re: Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

              Originally posted by Kenneth View Post

              Curious about the construction of your "wyes". Looks like they were custom made rather than stock items? The intersecting pieces appear to be just butted and spot soldered together but this surely can't be airtight? Is there more to it than meets the eye? I made my own that look very similar, but I soldered the entire intersection...
              Hi Kenneth,
              The wyes may not appear air tight from the outside, but the seams are very tight and they are all sealed on the inside with some black goop. From what I can tell, they are air tight.
              David

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              • #52

                Re: Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

                It's all looking good at this point, David; keep up the good work.

                I prefer to simply foil tape all my joints rather than using any of the more permanent methods. That way the joints are airtight, yet if you get a blockage or if you wish to do some readjustment (okay so who's not planning to ever add another machine, or move things around in their shop, right?!). Just my two-bits.
                All the best,

                Marty

                Secretary of Kingston Wood Artisans Inc. https://kwoodartca.wordpress.com/

                Master Mistake Fixer (because I've made them all... at least once)

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                • #53

                  Re: Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

                  Originally posted by MartyFromKingston View Post
                  It's all looking good at this point, David; keep up the good work.

                  I prefer to simply foil tape all my joints rather than using any of the more permanent methods. That way the joints are airtight, yet if you get a blockage or if you wish to do some readjustment (okay so who's not planning to ever add another machine, or move things around in their shop, right?!). Just my two-bits.
                  I agree Marty. I am using foil tape on all of my joints with the exception of the blast gates. For those, I am using silicone but I may look at the HVAC goop that Brian mentioned.

                  David

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                  • #54

                    Re: Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

                    So there *is* more than meets the eye! They are sealed on the inside. Mo, you've seen mine, and I'm sure you'll agree my soldering isn't pretty! :-)

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                    • #55

                      Re: Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

                      Originally posted by DGB_WAT View Post

                      Al,
                      Thanks for the suggestion. I don't have an angle grinder but I may need to get one if I get fed up with my jigsaw.
                      David
                      I used a short metal cutting blade on my jigsaw for cutting the 26 Ga duct & it worked great. Just keep the speed down & the blades will last a long time. I think I only went through 2 blades to do a couple of dozen cuts of 4" to 8" duct.

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                      • #56

                        Re: Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

                        It's been a busy week so my progress with the ductwork install has been slower than I wanted. Here is what I got done.

                        I connected my dual drum sander with a section of 6" flex hose and a blast gate. My drum sander is on a mobile base and I have to wheel it out of the way if I am cutting very large sheets on my table saw. To make this easy, I used a union to join the end of the flex hose with the blast gate; this makes it quick to disconnect the union. There may be a bit of air loss because this is not a sealed connection, but it does not seem to influence the performance and the loss is only when the blast gate is open. As you can see in the photo below, the cyclone is very close to the sander so there is minimal loss of suction. In fact, there is so much suction that it is hard to open the lid of the sander. Using my anemometer, I measured over 7000 ft/min of airflow at each of the 4" ports on the inside of the sander lid which amounts to more than 600 CFM per port. I used the sander on some shop sawn walnut veneer and it appeared to capture all of the dust. I'll be interested to see the numbers when I take measurements with my particle counter. The photo below also shows the table that I mentioned in a previous post; this table covers the pipes on the floor connected to my jointer and table saw.

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                        My 7" mainline pipe runs along the wall until it passes the window and then transitions to the ceiling using a pair of 45 degree elbows. With just a couple of screws per joint, the unsupported end of the pipe is surprising rigid.

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                        My basement shop has a suspended ceiling which can be a challenge but it provides some sound insulation and also gives my shop a cleaner look. To secure the pipe and fittings to the ceiling, I used two strips of wood separated by about 6" and screwed them through the ceiling panels into the joists above. I should be able to attach my metal pipe straps to this wood.

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                        Before ripping the wood strips, I decided to wire up one of my switch boxes so I could control the cyclone from my table saw. Since the switches only see 24V, I was able to use a thin 3 conductor wire and run it back to the control box near the cyclone. The front switch box in the photo below controls the cyclone. Behind it is the magnetic starter for my General 350 saw. The piece of wood between the two switches is my safety cutoff switch for the saw; a light tap with my foot near the bottom presses the off button on the magnetic starter and shuts down the saw.

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                        I'm using a 7x7x4 wye to connect some 4" pipe to my drill press. I secured the blast gate to the wall with some angle brackets.

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                        I wanted a swivel connection for the 90 degree elbow that is connected to the blast gate so that I could move the elbow out of the way if needed. I also wanted to be able to connect a longer piece of flex hose to this elbow to use with my floor sweep. After scratching my head for a while, I came up with the idea of attaching a wood collar to a section of pipe and having this collar swivel on a shelf as shown in the photo below. The pipe on the drill press side of the blast gate is not sealed so that it can rotate, but there is still plenty of suction.

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                        More to come as I work on the connection to my jointer.

                        David

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                        • #57

                          Re: Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

                          Drops should not come off the bottom, they should come off the side and then drop. The drop line going to your jointer will fill with chips especially if it is air tight, it will act as a cyclone.

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                          • #58

                            Re: Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

                            Originally posted by RV Sam View Post
                            Drops should not come off the bottom, they should come off the side and then drop. The drop line going to your jointer will fill with chips especially if it is air tight, it will act as a cyclone.
                            Can you explain that a bit more? Thanks.

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                            • #59

                              Re: Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

                              Originally posted by RV Sam View Post
                              Drops should not come off the bottom, they should come off the side and then drop. The drop line going to your jointer will fill with chips especially if it is air tight, it will act as a cyclone.
                              I'm going to have to keep an eye on that drop and I may need to run with the jointer blast gate open a bit so it is not air tight. In the worst case, I will adjust that drop so it comes off the side. I'm not sure about your comment about it acting like a cyclone. If that was the case, would it not do the same regardless of whether the drop comes off the side or the bottom?

                              David

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                              • #60

                                Re: Oneida Cyclone install thread - lots of photos

                                I don't think I would make it as an HVAC installer since I am much too slow running ductwork

                                Even so, I have more progress to report on the connections to my planer and my large bandsaw. Some years ago, I made the old dust hood on my planer to fit a 4" pipe. With the new setup, I am using a 6" feed so I needed to make a new hood. The end result is shown in the photos below. This was an exercise in compound angle joinery with the approximately 6" by 6" top cap funneling out to an opening about 13" by 2" at the cutterhead.

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                                The planer and the bandsaw are both fed from 6" taps off the 7" mainline. Trying to balance the fittings and measure the pipe length required some extra hands. Fortunately, my drill press was in the right location.

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                                The 6" pipe running to the bandsaw narrows down to a 5" connection for the bottom of the saw and a 3" connection for a hose near the blade. I need to work on a proper connection of this 3" hose to get as close to the blade as possible.

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                                I secured the 6" pipe to the back of the bandsaw using some wooden brackets.

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                                In looking at the previous photo and the photo below, I am not sure why I placed the blast gate on the down section of the 6" pipe behind the bandsaw. I would have been better to place it on the horizontal section since it will be easier to access from the front of the bandsaw. It will be easy to make this change but I will likely wait until I get more of the ductwork complete.

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                                The planer connection was a little simpler since it just has a blast gate and a piece of 6" flex hose connected to the dust hood. The suction at the planer is considerably better than before. I used to always get some chips coming out of the front of the planer and with the new setup, everything was getting sucked up. I'll measure the airflow in the coming days and post some data here.

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                                Thanks your comments and suggestions so far.

                                David

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