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  • Electric Motor Burning Smell, next steps?

    So I was doing a large run of crosscut's in cherry yesterday, when I started to smell a burning scent. Traced it back to the dust collector (Felder RL125). It could definitely be my fault for slacking off on the filter cleaning brush (my only major dislike of these units) during yesterdays and the previous days work, which was about 5 hours total run time on the table saw (ripping and then crosscutting about 200 identical pieces). I can see how the dust from the table saw could plug up the filter fairly fast with it's finer dust, then placing further stress on the motor. If that's what it is, it's 100% my fault, but I need some advice on what to do now:

    Do I clean out the filter, and try and finish my work as normal?
    Do I open up the dust collector to confirm the smell? (there's not really any proper steps for this in the manual I have, but I'm sure I'm mechanically inclined enough to get in there safely, and be a blessing to put everything back together properly)
    Is the motor never going to be the same and I have to take it to somebody to service?

    I have no real experience with electrical motors of this size so I'm not sure the proper steps to take. The only relevant experience I have is racing R/C cars over ten years ago, and the burning smell is oddly similar to when those motors would overheat. So any help is appreciated.

    Thanks in advance.
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  • #2

    Re: Electric Motor Burning Smell, next steps?

    The filter clogging will reduce air flow thereby reducing load on the motor not raising it.Burnt electric insulation is pretty much always terminal unless it comes from an external wire such as to the capacitor, or perhaps the cap itself. Don't feel bad!
    Rob

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    • #3

      Re: Electric Motor Burning Smell, next steps?

      Yeah, after talking to a couple people it does seem that is the case with less stress on the motor when plugged, learned something new today.

      Is there a way for me to confirm that is the motor at home?

      Would it be a bad idea to try and finish my work in it’s current state? The last thing I think anybody would want is a dust collector on fire.

      Thanks Rob

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      • #4

        Re: Electric Motor Burning Smell, next steps?

        If you smelt it you should not use it. you can see if it starts right up then it is not the capacitor but that is actually bad news.
        Rob

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        • #5

          Re: Electric Motor Burning Smell, next steps?

          Hi Chris, is it a 3 phase or single phase motor?

          Have you contacted Terry at Felder?

          Regards, Rod.
          Work is the curse of the riding class.

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          • #6

            Re: Electric Motor Burning Smell, next steps?

            That unique smell is from the varnish used on the windings to allow tight yet insulated coils. Chances are by the time you smell it, it has melted in some places and you now have shorts between some coil windings. That's why it's usually fatal to a motor.
            Happiness is a new blade!

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            • #7

              Re: Electric Motor Burning Smell, next steps?

              Darn, well I'll get into it this weekend and make sure it's not something else that's just rubbing or something and I'm getting my scents mixed up. Then we'll figure out what to do for a motor.

              Rod, I haven't got in contact with anybody at Felder yet, I'd like to know for sure what's causing the issue before calling them. It is 220 single phase.

              Thanks for the help guys.
              Last edited by cciszewski; 03-23-2018, 04:41 PM.

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