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Using Cheap Anemometers to Measure Dust Collector Performance

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  • Using Cheap Anemometers to Measure Dust Collector Performance

    I picked this up over at the Australian Wood Forums Site.

    Anemometer on special
    https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?sha...3&share_type=t

    Don

  • Don Burch
    replied
    Originally posted by al.m.. View Post
    i have never so one Don,not aware of how they can be used,but just thought if air volicity going into the filter could be monitored it may be helpful.
    still curious of how you plan on using it,for set up,tweaking the system,or random checks to monitor performance?
    Al, Sorry for not replying to your question. I acquired mine more by accident than desire. I was doing some mods to my piping and had an opportunity to do some measuring while the circuit was open. I do not believe these hand held units are of much use once you have your ducting sealed up, unless you have an access port. If it left your hand it would likely not survive the ride.
    Don

    Leave a comment:


  • MartyFromKingston
    replied
    My Oneida Pro 3HP cyclone came with one and like Rod, I check it every once in a while to know when to clean out the filter.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rod Sheridan
    replied
    Hi, I use a liquid filled manometer to measure filter restriction.

    it's always in the filter airstream, when it gets to 3" water column I clean the filter..........Regards, Rod.

    Leave a comment:


  • al.m..
    replied
    Originally posted by Don Burch View Post

    I don't follow your question Al. I believe a proper manometer would be the best, but you would not want to leave the tube in the stream while actually moving dust. The tube could get damaged or plugged up over time.
    Your furnace ducting usually has plastic plugs at various locations for testing.
    Like many I have one of the cheap anemometers. The velocity readings are greatest at the outer edge of the duct and much lower in the middle of the duct.
    For permanent, you could attach an ammeter and note the amp draw under different condition. The amp draw with all gates open should be higher than when all gates are closed. Low amps = low air flow.

    Don
    i have never so one Don,not aware of how they can be used,but just thought if air volicity going into the filter could be monitored it may be helpful.
    still curious of how you plan on using it,for set up,tweaking the system,or random checks to monitor performance?

    Leave a comment:


  • Don Burch
    replied
    Originally posted by al.m.. View Post
    I am curious what your plans for its use may be.it would be interesting if it could be installed in a pernament way to help monitor when filter maintenance,or a partial obstruction needed to be dealt with
    I don't follow your question Al. I believe a proper manometer would be the best, but you would not want to leave the tube in the stream while actually moving dust. The tube could get damaged or plugged up over time.
    Your furnace ducting usually has plastic plugs at various locations for testing.
    Like many I have one of the cheap anemometers. The velocity readings are greatest at the outer edge of the duct and much lower in the middle of the duct.
    For permanent, you could attach an ammeter and note the amp draw under different condition. The amp draw with all gates open should be higher than when all gates are closed. Low amps = low air flow.

    Don

    Leave a comment:


  • al.m..
    replied
    I am curious what your plans for its use may be.it would be interesting if it could be installed in a pernament way to help monitor when filter maintenance,or a partial obstruction needed to be dealt with

    Leave a comment:

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