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Static Electricty conductor wire cause clogging

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  • Glenn at Raven
    replied
    A good point Rod. Could have saved me a good length of copper wire!
    Glenn

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  • Rusty
    replied
    I agree totally. it's a scary situation but the anal guy who cleans his shop floor as soon as he finishes working has a bigger chance of getting a hot spark than guys like me who may go days before a cleanup. Don't forget it does not have to be your dust collector it could be any vacuum cleaner you use. It's always a good thing to be reminded of these possibilities. it's the same thing as spontaneous combustion with soaked rags. The possibility exists and it's easy to forget to work safely.

    I don't like to fill my bags uselessly and waste them so I always sweep up first and vac second.

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  • Randy in Calgary
    replied
    Originally posted by Rusty View Post
    If said metal object has been on the floor for any length of time it is likely cooled enough that it won't start a fire.
    The issue is whether the spark is buried in a dust pile and left to smolder, eventually igniting into flames. The other hazard with metal objects is if they are small enough to be sucked into the DC, they can hit the impeller and create a spark.

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  • Rod Sheridan
    replied
    Originally posted by Glenn at Raven View Post
    I use 4 inch flexible plastic hose which I move from one appliance to another. It has a spring steel coil incorporated in it to hold it open. When I first started to use it I got some very unpleasant shocks on touching it. Solved the problem by loosely wrapping a copper wire around the outside, grounded to the fan unit. Never any internal dust collection problem.
    Glenn
    Hi Glenn, the flex hose in my shop has the spiral wire grounded at the collector end, reduces static charge on the hose.....Rod.

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  • Glenn at Raven
    replied
    I use 4 inch flexible plastic hose which I move from one appliance to another. It has a spring steel coil incorporated in it to hold it open. When I first started to use it I got some very unpleasant shocks on touching it. Solved the problem by loosely wrapping a copper wire around the outside, grounded to the fan unit. Never any internal dust collection problem.
    Glenn

    Leave a comment:


  • Rusty
    replied
    Many years ago i was cutting a roll of plastic that was stretched over some abs pipe and just as I sliced it from underneath I got that shot Rod mentions right on the top of my head and it was a beauty. I jumped and at the same exact second sliced a 5 stitch cut in my thumb. The shock to my mellon was worse than the cut. Thanks for the memories Rod!

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  • Pietercape
    replied
    Many thanks to all who responded - I think I am going to follow the suggestions by beakie and Mike to place the conductor on the outside with self-tapping screws. Better safe than sorry.

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  • Jerome
    replied
    Originally posted by Pietercape View Post
    Thanks beakie and billh for your responses. I have read the article that billh referenced and it makes for very interesting reading, thanks for that. It seems I need to pay much more attention to emptying my dustbag and to stop being lazy and occasionally using the dust collector to do a quick cleanup around the planer where it can pickup a metalic object!
    attach rare earth magnets to you floor attachment and they will pick up the metal objects for you. Jack posted something about that awhile ago.

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  • Rod Sheridan
    replied
    Originally posted by big tim View Post
    I use 4" PVC ducting in my basement shop. The dust collector is an old CTC elcheapo unit. The ducting is not grounded anywhere.
    I use self-cleaning blast gates at every machine. I have never had any issue with static electricity.
    ????????????????,
    Cheers,

    Tim
    The only issue had Tim was that if I bent over to pick something up from the planer my head would be close to the plastic hose.

    It’s rather disconcerting to have your noggin act as the ground electrode, so I changed that to a piece of aluminum flex.

    Regards, Rod.

    Leave a comment:


  • big tim
    replied
    I use 4" PVC ducting in my basement shop. The dust collector is an old CTC elcheapo unit. The ducting is not grounded anywhere.
    I use self-cleaning blast gates at every machine. I have never had any issue with static electricity.
    ????????????????,
    Cheers,

    Tim

    Leave a comment:


  • Rod Sheridan
    replied
    Originally posted by Pietercape View Post
    For the first time in 15 years I am having an issue with blockages in the 4”ducting of my dust collection system. This set-up has been in place for 15+ years and has worked very well with no issues.
    I recently started a project using ¾” pine laminated shelving and have been planing 2 ft lengths of 9” width. The high volume of shavings have been snagging in the copper line running in both the 4” rigid collector tube as well as the flexible grey spiral connection to the planer. The copper line is the anti-static earthing conductor and runs on the inside of the pipes.
    The collector is a Delta 50-760 with 1200cfm capacity and the tubing runs are short resulting in high velocities. Problem seems to be that the planer shavings are 3” + long (softwood) and snag at he point where the wire exits the pipe at the couplings. The system clogs up pretty quickly and shavings start flying from the in-feed side of the planer. Static electricity is an issue over the winter months here on the Prairies.
    I am looking for an alternative to running the anti-static lines inside the collector tubing. Any suggestions will be much appreciated – unclogging collector lines is not my favorite pastime!
    Switch to metal ducting and increase the duct diameter, 4 inch is pretty small for a machine.....Regards, Rod

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  • Mike in Waubaushene
    replied
    Originally posted by beakie View Post
    if I understand it, you're using pvc/plastic ducting?
    if so, would moving the wire to the outside of the pipe BUT adding some self tapping screws through the ducting so they poke out into the air stream? then attach the screws to the grounding wire.


    no experience with it, just thinking outloud.
    I did exactly as you stated 30 years ago at my precious location. 4” PVC piping with 18 gauge stranded copper wire, attached to a 3/4” screw every 3-4 feet. It never clogged and I never had a static problem. The wire was attached to all the tools on the system.

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  • Rusty
    replied
    If said metal object has been on the floor for any length of time it is likely cooled enough that it won't start a fire.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pietercape
    replied
    Thanks beakie and billh for your responses. I have read the article that billh referenced and it makes for very interesting reading, thanks for that. It seems I need to pay much more attention to emptying my dustbag and to stop being lazy and occasionally using the dust collector to do a quick cleanup around the planer where it can pickup a metalic object!

    Leave a comment:


  • billh
    replied
    Beakie's suggestion is one of the methods. For a more definitive explanation of the situation have a look at Rod Cole's treatise on the subject. Anyway, the wire inside the pipe is the problem and needs to be removed.
    http://www.woodcentral.com/articles/...cles_221.shtml

    billh

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