Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cyclone outside?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16

    Re: Cyclone outside?

    If you turn your shop into a vacuum chamber air will infiltrate all over the place, opening the way for warm air to escape when blower is not running. If your door opens outward you may find it hard to push!
    nnieman likes this.

    Comment

    • Thread Continues Below...

    • #17

      Re: Cyclone outside?

      Originally posted by iamtooler View Post
      If you turn your shop into a vacuum chamber air will infiltrate all over the place, opening the way for warm air to escape when blower is not running. If your door opens outward you may find it hard to push!
      I did not think of that!!

      Nathan

      Comment


      • #18

        Re: Cyclone outside?

        As posted in the other similar subject posted today, that is what a negative pressure damper is all about. Turn your DC on and it opens as the shop press. goes negative to return it to atmospheric press. Shut the DC off and it closes to prevent drafts They don't seal very well when the wind is blowing so a box with a dadoed sliding door over it gives you a very good seal when the DC is not in use.

        Edit: Without it, if you have a well sealed shop you will not only drop your shop atmospheric press. negative you will reduce the ability of your DC to move anywhere near as much air. (your DC suction will go down considerably). You can open a window but who wants to do that every time you run your DC.
        Last edited by Carlosinthesticks; 09-20-2019, 05:33 PM.

        Comment


        • #19

          Re: Cyclone outside?

          Originally posted by al.m.. View Post
          playing with the idea of building a small lean to on the outside of my shop to house my cyclone.the addition would be un heated,with two ducts leading inside the shop,one for the mains,and one for the filter so no warm air would be blown outside.Thought I could also tee off the filer duct ,with a couple blast gates so in warm weather the filter could be by passed .
          Heres what's being debated in my head. The cyclone is a Oneida v3000, the plastic version.would the freezing temps in the winter cause it to become brittle and possiably break is a large enough piece of wood went thought the system? Also,could the warm air passing through the cold cyclone cause condensation issues leading to damp shavings causing clogs or sticking to the cyclone affecting performance?
          if so,plan b would be to allow the addition to be heated,but that would not be as effective in reducing noise
          am I thinking too hard?
          Mine's been in an attached shed that is not heated for the last 20 yrs. I heat with a wood stove primarily and do not notice a difference in heat when it's running. I don't run it very long at a time but it can stay on for a while when I'm planing wood. I have enough air infiltration so as not to worry but all you'd have to do is have a very small vent for it to work properly. After all, it's only a 4" pipe coming out. If you have a larger one then maybe a bit more air movement.

          Comment


          • #20

            Re: Cyclone outside?

            I think I am missing something so hopefully somebody can explain. I understand the space issue especially in a small shop but I dont understand wanting to move my dust collector outside because it is noisy inside the shop. It is connected to my table saw, jointer, planer, router etc. which are all just as loud if not louder than my dust collector so I still have to wear hearing protection anyway. What is the point.
            Mike

            Comment


            • #21

              Re: Cyclone outside?

              I applaud your use of hearing protection Mike.I would argue my dc is one ,if not the loudest machine in my shop. Some other machines,like the bandsaw and drill press are very quite on thier own,so the dc makes using them,and others very noisy.simple things like using a palm sander warrants hearing protection when using the dust collector with it,I would like to lessen the decibal levels
              iamtooler likes this.

              Comment

              • Thread Continues Below...

              • #22

                Re: Cyclone outside?

                Originally posted by mike66 View Post
                I think I am missing something so hopefully somebody can explain. I understand the space issue especially in a small shop but I dont understand wanting to move my dust collector outside because it is noisy inside the shop. It is connected to my table saw, jointer, planer, router etc. which are all just as loud if not louder than my dust collector so I still have to wear hearing protection anyway. What is the point.
                Mike
                You don't leave your jointer/planer/tablesaw running the whole time though...

                I usually leave my cyclone running most of the time I'm in the shop. Maybe it would be nice to not have the noise constantly there, even though cutting machines aren't running... or maybe even take the hearing protection off between machine runs, listen to some music or something...

                Moving noise out of the shop is good.

                Comment


                • #23

                  Re: Cyclone outside?

                  I can see the noise improvement.

                  My planer is quite loud, but many other tools - the table saws, drill press, spindle sander, band saw, etc... - are surprisingly quiet. The DC, however, is very loud. My planer is right beside the DC, and the combination of the two of them at once is very loud indeed. I have radio head phones for hearing protection, and when planing I usually have to put music on, as any kind of talking program you won't be able to hear it over the machines, even with the volume at max.

                  From my perspective, the other advantage of having the DC outside is that, not limited by ceiling height, you could have a much larger collection bin. At the same time, I imagine you would need a bin full alarm, as you wouldn't be able to see it when it's outside.

                  Comment


                  • #24

                    Re: Cyclone outside?

                    One thing that has not been address in this thread,ot Nathans similar one is heat in the warm months.will having the cyclone I a small enclosed be a issue the? Would a roof vent and some vents in the walls be enough to keep things cool?

                    Comment


                    • #25

                      Re: Cyclone outside?

                      Originally posted by al.m.. View Post
                      I applaud your use of hearing protection Mike.I would argue my dc is one ,if not the loudest machine in my shop. Some other machines,like the bandsaw and drill press are very quite on thier own,so the dc makes using them,and others very noisy.simple things like using a palm sander warrants hearing protection when using the dust collector with it,I would like to lessen the decibal levels
                      I guess I never thought of it that way but thank you for your comments. Just force of habit for me and think of it as all my machines make noise so as I only have 200 square feet of shop I have four sets of headphones around the shop so if I’m turning a machine on I grab a pair and the don’t find the dust collector adds any more. Maybe too much loud music as a teenager so need to protect what hearing I have left. Thanks again.

                      Mike

                      Comment


                      • #26

                        Re: Cyclone outside?

                        Originally posted by al.m.. View Post
                        One thing that has not been address in this thread,ot Nathans similar one is heat in the warm months.will having the cyclone I a small enclosed be a issue the? Would a roof vent and some vents in the walls be enough to keep things cool?
                        with well placed venting, there should be enough air flow to keep it cool.

                        1 vent low
                        1 vent up high
                        natural convection (that right word?) should keep warmer air moving out.

                        or if the motors fan moves enough air, just have 1 vent on opposite walls and it should allow a cross breeze to let fresh air movement, aided by the fan.





                        my DC is in an insulated and enclosed closet. the only air gap is 1" all around the top 3 sides (1 side is shop wall)
                        with the DC on it moves enough air around to stay cool it seems. even when running for an hour or so planing a bunch of walnut, it had no issues.

                        that said, it would hurt me to add a small vent @ the bottom to provide fresh cool air.
                        [insert something witty here]

                        Comment

                        • Thread Continues Below...
                        Working...
                        X