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  • #16

    Re: had to get this off my chest

    Re: had to get this off my chest

    I am guilty of most of the things in the picture. Well all, I guess, except I require bifocals to get about and I had them made with safety glass and frames. But, no guard, no splitter, push sticks. Thats me. Wont say it wont happen the next time I use my saw, but 40 years and counting I still have all my fingers and no tatoos on my gut from kickbacks. I use pushsticks and like John, I go around the back and pull a lot of the stuff thru.
    Discussion is the mother or father of ideas.
    Discord is the bastard son of discussion.


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    • #17

      Re: had to get this off my chest

      Re: had to get this off my chest

      Originally posted by BearLeeAlive View Post
      Safety glasses would be a good thing, for sure. I use mine most of the time, but who here can honestly say that they use them every last time they use a tool or machine. I know I am guilty, and I would estimate that probably only 75% of the time I use glasses, though almost 100% of the time I use hearing protection as the dust collector is the noisiest machine in my shop.
      I will say that I do not use any of my large power tools without glasses. I have on several occasions not done any woodworking as I could not find my glasses. I try to keep 3-4 pairs of glasses in and around for just that reason.

      I will admit to using a power drill to put in screws without glasses, but never a saw, jointer, plainer, or drill press. I guess you have to pick which rules you will never break.

      Matt.
      Matt

      People are like a box of chocolates. It's hard to tell initially which ones are nuts.

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      • #18

        Re: had to get this off my chest

        Re: had to get this off my chest

        Originally posted by Mike in Waubaushene View Post
        But, no guard, no splitter, push sticks. Thats me. Wont say it wont happen the next time I use my saw, but 40 years and counting I still have all my fingers and no tatoos on my gut from kickbacks.
        Me too. Because I use cabinet saws and job site table saws and do a lot of fitting with them I can't do the work I do with guards on the saws. I use a pushstick, sometimes it's a piece of scrap or the end of my hammer but I do use a pushstick. I know enough never to get my hands behind the blade and never pull stock through. That's the first thing you learn as a helper when using a table saw, always let the front guy control the feed.

        I said that I never get my hands behind the blade. Well I have broken that rule on occasion and after using a table saw daily for 30 years one day, foolishly, I tempted fate and lost a finger and badly mangled another one and since the day after I did it I was to start a job that I lined up to get me through the recession as a carpenter foreman finishing a large hospital project, I lost at least couple of hundred grand and had to change career paths as well. My bread and butter was installing commercial doors and hardware which requires a lot of mechanical dexterity. I was really good at it, I loved that aspect of the job and it was a valuable skill. As a contractor it got me in the door on a lot of projects where I picked up the complete millwork and finish carpentry package. I can't do that any more. After 3 years I have enough dexterity that I can do woodworking and most other carpentry but no where near enough for hardware. I'm moving into a position as a trainer for the carpenters union but that won't be full time for 6 or 8 months. Right now I'm finishing basements and doing small woodworking jobs.

        All this because I was too lazy to get a jig saw out of the truck and broke the simple rule of never getting my hand behind the blade. I'll be honest with everyone, I'm saving up for a slider and until I get one I use a table saw without a guard. A well tuned, well cared for table saw with sharp blades and I'm still confident about using the saw as long as I stay in front of the blade.

        I have to go now and see if my not so well cared for snow blower will start. I've left it warming up in the shop.

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        • #19

          Re: had to get this off my chest

          Re: had to get this off my chest

          I don't get the phobia about table saw guards.
          I have a General 350 with stock guard/splitter/anti-kickback fingers. Over the mouth of the guard (where the dust flied) sits a 4" dust extraction hose which leads to an overhead duct. I don't need to see the cut. The fence is dead accurate so why do I need to see the cut? The guard is visual; it helps keep the stock down on the table; the anti-kickback fingers prevent kickback - in fact I often leave the stock to go around the saw and pull the last bit through; the splitter does its thing.
          The only time that guard is off is when I have no choice - dados, cutting coves et cetera.
          Re. safety glasses..I don't use them unless there's an obvious risk. And I don't see any risk at most machinery I use including the table saw.
          I know we have medicare...I just don't want to use it.

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          • #20

            Re: had to get this off my chest

            Re: had to get this off my chest

            You are absolutely correct. In most, if not almost all, cases it is not necessary to see the cut. You can tell more about how the cutting is going from the sound of the cutting and the tactile feedback when feeding the work into the blade. Even more to the point, the TS cut starts from bottom-rear of the workpiece; by the time you see the blade above the workpiece it is too late if the cut isn't in the right place anyway.

            I won't argue that many stock guards are not ideal but they do work.

            billh

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            • #21

              Re: had to get this off my chest

              Re: had to get this off my chest

              I've seen worse. I've done worse. This is not really such a big deal. How you work has a huge amount to do with your personal comfort levels combined with your level of skill and your familiarity with your equipment. If you think this is bad, you should try working on a construction site or in a mine stope underground......

              cheers

              John

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              • #22

                Re: had to get this off my chest

                Re: had to get this off my chest

                Take a closer look at the guy... guaranteed he's got Abs of Steel!!! No kickback is going to hurt him!

                The only knick I have taken was while reaching for my pushstick, I grazed the TS blade. If I hadn't tried to be safe, I never would have gotten hurt. Now, I don't use a push stick, no fence, keep the lights off, and only use wet wood with nails in it.
                "Time is a great teacher, but unfortunately it kills all its pupils."

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                • #23

                  Re: had to get this off my chest

                  Re: had to get this off my chest

                  I can't believe someone started a thread about this.

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                  • #24

                    Re: had to get this off my chest

                    Re: had to get this off my chest

                    Originally posted by Max In Sudbury View Post
                    The only knick I have taken was while reaching for my pushstick, I grazed the TS blade. If I hadn't tried to be safe, I never would have gotten hurt.
                    C'mon Max .... admit it .... if you'd really tried hard to be safe you wouldn't have been rolling a cigarette with the other hand while you reached for the push stick.....

                    cheers

                    John

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                    • #25

                      Re: had to get this off my chest

                      Re: had to get this off my chest

                      Originally posted by John Bartley View Post
                      C'mon Max .... admit it .... if you'd really tried hard to be safe you wouldn't have been rolling a cigarette with the other hand while you reached for the push stick.....

                      cheers

                      John

                      No, the worst part was that I spilled my beer when I knicked my finger. Looking back, I should have turned the saw off before I licked the beer of the saw top... that was just stupid dangerous!
                      "Time is a great teacher, but unfortunately it kills all its pupils."

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                      • #26

                        Re: had to get this off my chest

                        Re: had to get this off my chest

                        Steven, this is the type of push stick I use on the table saw. It even doubles as a jointer push stick with narrower stock.
                        Attached Files
                        ______________________________________________
                        Rob Brown
                        Editor - Canadian Woodworking & Home Improvement

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                        • #27

                          Re: had to get this off my chest

                          Re: had to get this off my chest

                          Originally posted by Rob Brown View Post
                          Steven, this is the type of push stick I use on the table saw. It even doubles as a jointer push stick with narrower stock.
                          Rob, it would also triple as a kids toy rabbit.

                          Nice design though, I think I shall plagiarize.
                          Looks like a good way to use up some of my 1/2" BB scraps.
                          JIM
                          Calgary, AB

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                          • #28

                            Re: had to get this off my chest

                            Inthewoodshop

                            Why do you say that? I think the main gist of the post was the OP thought it was an unsafe practice. By posting and encouraging some discussion, someone just starting out may learn a safer way of doing what is an everyday task on the table saw. I don't see it as a big deal, each of us will work to their own comfort level, but a beginner may save himself some grief, by preventing an accident.
                            Some people like to create their own storms and then complain when it rains.

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                            • #29

                              Re: had to get this off my chest

                              Re: had to get this off my chest

                              Your posting on injuries vs self taught or "professionally trained" is an excellent question and I don't think I have ever read a study on the topic. It may have more to do with how cautious one person is inately rather than by training. I've met some PhD's whom I thought were idiots with no understanding of the practicalities of constructing the project of which they were considered experts.

                              I've been doing woodworking for 40 years, still have all ten fingers, don't use a splitter or guard and can remember only a couple of instances of kickback on 8/4 and 12/4 stock in much longer lengths. I stood off to the side. Drywall can be patched.

                              A good posting and worthy of further discussion.

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