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  • stripping BX

    What is the best way to strip BX cable? I usually nip at it with side cutters but sometimes nip to deep and one end is always easier than the other. I was just wondering how others do it.
    Jerome
    Canada's South Coast

    Port Colborne On.
    CARPENTER noun. (car-pun-ter)
    1) A person who solves problems you can't.
    2) One who does precision guesswork based on unreliable data, provided by those of questionable knowledge. see also: wizard, magician.
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  • #2

    Re: stripping BX

    I cut off the plastic casing and then crack the aluminum and nip with side cutters.
    Erik

    Canada's Island Paradise - Prince Edward Island

    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club

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    • #3

      Re: stripping BX

      Cut the armour at an angle with a hacksaw..............Regards, Rod.
      mikeddd, scooby074 and nugsthecat like this.
      Work is the curse of the riding class.

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      • #4

        Re: stripping BX

        I bend to break the armour, then use cutters to nip the aluminum. It can be challenging, but with practice, works well. There are dedicated strippers for AC90 armour, but I've never used any of them, so can't comment there. If I was starting over, I'd give them a shot, but I've been doing it this way for so many years and haven't felt the need to change, mainly because that's just one more bulky tool to have to carry.

        Larger AC90, above #10, or teck cable, or liquid tight flex, I use Rod's method & cut at an angle with a fine tooth hack saw.

        Whatever method you use, be sure to use an anti-short bushing. Inspectors seem to have special radar for missing anti-shorts, and for very good reason.
        ErikM likes this.

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        • #5

          Re: stripping BX

          Same here for the smaller size cables bend break and a little twist and cut with side cutters and hack saw for larger size cables. I have only worked with one other guy that actually bought the tool to cut BX but it seemed a little bulky and awkward to use but did give a clean cut.
          If you want me to make it i need this new tool first

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          • #6

            Re: stripping BX

            I first learned to cut BX from my father, you never, ever, cut BX more than once with sidecutters

            Of course for TECK or Coreflex you also use a hacksaw with a fine tooth blade.....Rod
            Work is the curse of the riding class.

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            • #7

              Re: stripping BX

              Originally posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
              I first learned to cut BX from my father, you never, ever, cut BX more than once with sidecutters

              Of course for TECK or Coreflex you also use a hacksaw with a fine tooth blade.....Rod
              I do it all the time. Quick & mostly easy, but take practice.

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              • #8

                Re: stripping BX

                Originally posted by drzaius View Post

                I do it all the time. Quick & mostly easy, but take practice.
                Oh, I agree, and I see it done all the time, just not when my dad was watching. He considered it a sign of poor work habits.....Rod.
                Work is the curse of the riding class.

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                • #9

                  Re: stripping BX

                  Originally posted by Rod Sheridan View Post

                  Oh, I agree, and I see it done all the time, just not when my dad was watching. He considered it a sign of poor work habits.....Rod.
                  I'm curious as to why it is a sign of poor work habits. If done correctly, I see nothing wrong with it. What did he use?

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                  • #10

                    Re: stripping BX

                    An old electrician showed me, give the end a sharp bend, give it a twist to open up the bend point just enough and cut, once you open it up the coil you never nick the wire👍
                    sigpicToday's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut, that held its ground.

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                    • #11

                      Re: stripping BX

                      Originally posted by drzaius View Post

                      I'm curious as to why it is a sign of poor work habits. If done correctly, I see nothing wrong with it. What did he use?
                      My father always used a hacksaw, he learned the trade in the 30’s and just had certain views on workmanship. Of course at that time small wiring was soldered, I still have his naphtha blow torch and soldering iron...Rod.
                      Work is the curse of the riding class.

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                      • #12

                        Re: stripping BX

                        Originally posted by Mark in Burlington View Post
                        An old electrician showed me, give the end a sharp bend, give it a twist to open up the bend point just enough and cut, once you open it up the coil you never nick the wire👍
                        That's pretty much my process.

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                        • #13

                          Re: stripping BX

                          Originally posted by Rod Sheridan View Post

                          My father always used a hacksaw, he learned the trade in the 30’s and just had certain views on workmanship. Of course at that time small wiring was soldered, I still have his naphtha blow torch and soldering iron...Rod.
                          I can understand that. I have "things" myself that I just have to do a certain way.

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                          • #14

                            Re: stripping BX

                            Thanks, everyone
                            Jerome
                            Canada's South Coast

                            Port Colborne On.
                            CARPENTER noun. (car-pun-ter)
                            1) A person who solves problems you can't.
                            2) One who does precision guesswork based on unreliable data, provided by those of questionable knowledge. see also: wizard, magician.

                            Comment

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