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  • I have to double check "electrical"

    I have a double 20amp 120/240 circuits with 12/2 wire that use to be for a hot water heater in my house. The black going to one circuit the white to the other. This gives this line 240? and I can run my 220 planer from this line? The breakers are the second set on the left from the top. Sorry my pic's really suck but you get the idea.


    I know nothing of electrics, and thought I would double check with real people, as I would not like to blow my planer up or set my house on fire, as I'm sure the wife would not like that too much.
    Thank you
    Stephen
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  • #2

    Re: I have to double check "electrical"

    Given your apparent uncertainty and inexperience, it would probably be safest to bring in a friend or some other person who knows what they're doing.

    That said, a 20A 240V circuit from a water heater should work just fine for a 240V planer rated for up to 16A (generally this means up to 3HP).

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    • #3

      Re: I have to double check "electrical"

      The engine is 15amps 2hp. I did it this morning, works just fine, Thanks thou. I did a bunch of research, but never talked to somebody sooo... I went with the research and it worked just fine I was not certain if home panels would have anything larger than 240, after I figure out it was not 550 or something, it only left the circuit being 240, due to the way it was wired. I was hoping to confirm my research with somebody, but after a silly amount of time spent doing the research, and than confirming it for hours last night I went for it. I really recommend confirming research as hitting the button for the first time was an incredible agonizing moment. Luckly I didn't blow my planer or set the house on fire..

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      • #4

        Re: I have to double check "electrical"

        I can't help but think to myself that the women readers of this thread are thinking to themselves ... men, totally lost and still really, really don't want to stop and ask for directons. Must be in the jeans. LMAO

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        • #5

          Re: I have to double check "electrical"

          Originally posted by Ed in Leaside View Post
          I can't help but think to myself that the women readers of this thread are thinking to themselves ... men, totally lost and still really, really don't want to stop and ask for directons. Must be in the jeans. LMAO

          well I'm not really going to disagree with you, in my defence, like I said I did do the research for a week, many many web sites later and after confirming my research, and realizing that it could not be anything else but a 240 line, I went for it .. Yes I should have confirmed it.. with a real person. I looked at water heaters, electrical web site, sellers of panels, and every aspect there was to look at. I felt FAIRLY confident... I really don't have a problem stopping for directions. I'll ask anybody walking down the street if they know where such and such a place is.... I really don't like driving in circles. I really don't want to start a gender topic but...... Allot of the women I know are a whole lot more stubborn than your average man. Maybe just my expirence but I don't think so

          Cheers
          Stephen

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          • #6

            Re: I have to double check "electrical"

            Electric Load

            The only problem I see in what you did was if you are doing the laundry and planing at the same time, you could blow the breaker. The breaker was likely sized to be a bit bigger than was required for the heater, and may not carry the heater and the planer at the same time.
            In an age when scientists are creating artificial intelligence, too many of our educational institutions seem to be creating artificial stupidity. - Thomas Sowell

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            • #7

              Re: I have to double check "electrical"

              Originally posted by Gene45 View Post
              The only problem I see in what you did was if you are doing the laundry and planing at the same time, you could blow the breaker. The breaker was likely sized to be a bit bigger than was required for the heater, and may not carry the heater and the planer at the same time.

              Gene I had the same thought as you but in I looked back at the original post and Steve says "wire that use to be for a hot water heater"

              The only problem that I see is the white wire should be coloured with a marker when it is carrying power.


              Gary
              Gary in Niagara (Fenwick, Ontario)

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              • #8

                Re: I have to double check "electrical"

                It was a dedicated breaker for the hot water heater and has nothing to do with the dryer"separate line all together". I did red sharpie the white wire, just in case I sell or the electrician is working, without me being home to inform him/her. I think the receptacle should give it away, but not positive about that. Thanks thou

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                • #9

                  Re: I have to double check "electrical"

                  Originally posted by steve in ottawa View Post
                  It was a dedicated breaker for the hot water heater and has nothing to do with the dryer"separate line all together". I did red sharpie the white wire, just in case I sell or the electrician is working, without me being home to inform him/her. I think the receptacle should give it away, but not positive about that. Thanks thou

                  Hi Steve

                  What you're preposing is fine depending on the full load current of your planer, breaker size for a motor is 250% of the full load current of the motor. I'm glad to see you made the white wire permanently red, hopefully on both ends.

                  Mike
                  Mike

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                  • #10

                    Re: I have to double check "electrical"

                    Hey Mike, I was hoping to hear from you, I'm not sure I understand you,


                    you said: What you're preposing is fine depending on the full load current of your planer, breaker size for a motor is 250% of the full load current of the motor.

                    It is a 15amp 220 motor,200 volts, 60Hz. are you saying I need a 50amp breaker? unfortunately the manual I got with the planer was for a 12amp motor, and does not even mention motor spec's in it

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: I have to double check "electrical"

                      Originally posted by steve in ottawa View Post
                      Hey Mike, I was hoping to hear from you, I'm not sure I understand you,


                      you said: What you're preposing is fine depending on the full load current of your planer, breaker size for a motor is 250% of the full load current of the motor.

                      It is a 15amp 220 motor,200 volts, 60Hz. are you saying I need a 50amp breaker? unfortunately the manual I got with the planer was for a 12amp motor, and does not even mention motor spec's in it
                      Hi Steve

                      You have to look on the name plate of your planer motor, it will have blocked areas with subtitles, look under or beside the subtitle that says FLA. It may say something like 16A to 18A if your planer has a 3 hp motor.

                      Take FLA x 250% = breaker size but don't exceed 250%, go down to the next available breaker size. The larger breaker size allows for the high starting current of the motor.

                      In your case

                      ex. 15A x 2.5 = 37.5A since their isn't a 37.5A breaker available, you require a 30A breaker. Wire for motors is sized at 125% of the FLA of the motor. 15 x 1.25 = 18.75A you require #12 wire.

                      These rules really throw some people who are accustomed to the 80% loading rules, but motors are an entirely different animal compared to normal residential wiring.

                      Hope this better explains
                      Mike
                      Mike

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