FREE SAMPLE ISSUE FREE NEWSLETTER DIGITAL ISSUE PREVIEW

Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Chisel handle replacement

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Corner Brook
    Posts
    160

    Default Chisel handle replacement

    I just got an old 1 3/4" chisel. I'm not sure what type you would call it, but the blade is about 5 inches long, is beveled along the sides, and the handle fits into a round socket in the blade. The handle is really well beaten, and desperately needs replacing. I don't have a lathe, so any ideas on how to make a new handle and bring the chisel back to life?

    The blade was really dull, and the cutting edge was probably used as a prybar or crate opener. I brought the edge 90 to the sides with a file and square, then lapped the back on 220/ 240 / 600/ 800 grit sand paper on glass. Finaly, I used a Record honing guide and 240/ 600/ 800 grit sandpaper on glass to re-form the bevel at 30 degrees. Now it slices thin shavings on oak end grain instead of prying baseboards off the wall, as the previous owner used it for.

    I'm thinking of making a square form for the handle, and paring it with a spoke shave to bring it round, and carving a new end to fit the socket in the blade.

    I'd also like to fit a short section of copper pipe on the end of the handle, to prevent splitting when struck by a mallet.
    Bill

  2. #2

    Default

    Everything you said looks good to me, with one small difference.
    A number of years ago when I took up turning, (sold my lathe and everything with it now) I made all my own handles for my turning chisels. Instead of a piece of copper pipe for the hosel (I think that's what it's called) I used the thingy that is used to solder join 2 pcs of copper pipe.
    Mack C. in Brooklin (Whitby) ON
    It feels really great to sell a pen;
    It feels even greater to give one to a friend!

    If your presence doesn't make an impact,
    Your absence won't make a difference!

    I am a proud supporter of
    "Pens for Canadian Peacekeepers"!
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/One-o...95203433854962

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mack C. in Brooklin ON
    Everything you said looks good to me, with one small difference.
    A number of years ago when I took up turning, (sold my lathe and everything with it now) I made all my own handles for my turning chisels. Instead of a piece of copper pipe for the hosel (I think that's what it's called) I used the thingy that is used to solder join 2 pcs of copper pipe.
    Mack: I think the join thingy your are referring to is called a coupling. Couplings are usually a bit thicker than pipe and sometimes harder. This would be an improvement over plain pipe I think.

    E.G.
    You stop learning the instant you start talking...
    And start again when you stop thinking how smart you are.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    1,471

    Default

    Hi Bill and everyone,
    Actually the ring at the end of the handle where the mallet strikes is called a hoop (there might be other terms for it though). You could make one out of copper or just about any pipe. You can also make a hoop out of a ferrule (like the brass ferrules that LV sells), although this changes the feel of the chisel if you want to push it by hand (German-pattern chisels have ferrule-type hoops, like Two Cherries, Hirsch, and Pfeil). Just make sure, no matter which type of hoop you use, that there is wood that sticks out the end beyond the metal, so you're hitting wood. Your mallets and your ears will thank you for it.
    BTW, hoops are not necessary, even if they may help a little. I have a 150-year-old mortise chisel with no hoop that was clearly put to use, and it still has the original handle.
    I can't really help with making a socket-chisel handle with no lathe since I've never done it, but I'm pretty sure you can do a good enough job with a spokeshave and/or a chisel or rasp. If you can chuck it in a drill press you could probably finish off the rounding and fine-tune the taper with sandpaper. Or you could finish with chalk, fitting and taking off the high spots.
    HTH
    Last edited by Frank D.; 09-06-2006 at 04:42 PM.
    Frank
    SPCHT

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Oakville, ON
    Posts
    634

    Default

    Bill,

    So you want to make a handle for a socket chisel without a lathe?
    It isn't difficult, just tedious.

    First off you need to rough out the shape. You can measure the diameter at the open end easily enough with a rule or calipers. Next you need to figure out how long and what taper. Get out your drill index, and use the butt ends of various drill bits to find one that bottoms out in the socket. This will give you the length and the small-end diameter of the taper.

    Shave down the end of your handle blank to match the socket, then mark the length, and then the small diameter on the end. Shave down close to the marks. Once you get close, stick the handle into the socket and give it a slight twist. Don't spin it, just twist it enough to make the 'high' spots show up. I'll bet the inside of that socket is really filthy, so it will mark your taper quite nicely. Oh, and put a mark on the handle indicating which side goes "down" so that you always put the handle on the same way. The insides of those sockets are not necessarily perfect conical tapers!

    use a scraper or file to keep taking the high spots off the taper until it gets stuck when you push it in when trying to mark it. You should then be close to a good fit. If you start to bottom out in the socket, trim the end of the taper a bit.

    Rinse and repeat until it makes a solid friction fit. Drive it home.

    Good luck. Take pictures, post them and let us know how it goes.
    Wood Hoarder, Blade Sharpener, and Occasional Tool User

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank D.
    Hi Bill and everyone,
    Actually the ring at the end of the handle where the mallet strikes is called a hoop
    HTH
    Hi Frank; actually I was talking of the ring that holds the chisel, not the end you hit. It's called a thingey!
    Mack C. in Brooklin (Whitby) ON
    It feels really great to sell a pen;
    It feels even greater to give one to a friend!

    If your presence doesn't make an impact,
    Your absence won't make a difference!

    I am a proud supporter of
    "Pens for Canadian Peacekeepers"!
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/One-o...95203433854962

  7. #7

    Default

    Edward; I like thingey better! OK let it be called a coupling.
    Mack C. in Brooklin (Whitby) ON
    It feels really great to sell a pen;
    It feels even greater to give one to a friend!

    If your presence doesn't make an impact,
    Your absence won't make a difference!

    I am a proud supporter of
    "Pens for Canadian Peacekeepers"!
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/One-o...95203433854962

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    1,682

    Default

    Actually it's called a ferrule. If you want to use copper pipe for a hoop, try using industrial copper pipe instead of residential.
    Brent

    SPCHT

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    1,471

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Brent in Montreal
    Actually it's called a ferrule.
    Actually I'm prety sure it's called a thingey Brent. Not sure where I learned that, but...
    Frank
    SPCHT

  10. #10

    Default

    Hi Frank; not only do we have the same # of posts; but we are of the same mind as well.
    Mack C. in Brooklin (Whitby) ON
    It feels really great to sell a pen;
    It feels even greater to give one to a friend!

    If your presence doesn't make an impact,
    Your absence won't make a difference!

    I am a proud supporter of
    "Pens for Canadian Peacekeepers"!
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/One-o...95203433854962

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Corner Brook
    Posts
    160

    Default

    I have a picture of similar chisels that I lifted fom eBay this morning. The chisel I have is from Erik Anton Berg Eskilstuna Sweden, with a shark logo. I'm not familiar with this brand of tool, does anyone know if the steel is of good quality. It seemed faily hard when I was honing it, it responded well to the file and sandpaper (no hard spots or too-hard shiny places). I'll take a few pics when I make the handle.

    The chisel I have is like the bigger ones in this set. 1/34"
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Bill

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Thornhill/Vaughan, ON
    Posts
    92

    Default

    Here is an article somebody wrote up on their chisel handle making adventures:
    http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4031

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    1,471

    Default

    Bergs eh? Oooooh, nice.
    See this thread:
    http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/h....pl?read=96958
    Frank
    SPCHT

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Corner Brook
    Posts
    160

    Default

    I did a little research on Berg, it's nice to know when you've made a good find, especially a free one.
    Bill

Similar Threads

  1. A better handle position of table saw
    By Bennett Y in forum Power Tools
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-15-2006, 11:20 PM
  2. Where to buy handle for Stanley Plane?
    By Jason in Sudbury in forum Hand Tools
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 07-18-2006, 04:35 PM
  3. Chisel purchase - initial impresisons
    By Kerry in Fort Sask, AB in forum Hand Tools
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-09-2006, 07:25 PM
  4. Cross Slide Vise for Mortising
    By Pete in Milton in forum Power Tools
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-28-2005, 09:34 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •