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Thread: Black walnut trees are beautiful, but...

  1. #1

    Default Black walnut trees are beautiful, but...

    ...they sure are a pain to pick up after.

    IMG_0570 (Small).JPG

    IMG_0572 (Small).JPG

    This represents about half the "harvest". The other half falls on my neighbor's property.

    Luckily, he likes to eat them, so I don't have to go pick up the nuts that fall on his property. I pray he never moves!

  2. #2

    Default Re: Black walnut trees are beautiful, but...

    Interesting. I've never seen a walnut 'au naturale' before. They look like apples (really bad apples ). Cool.

    Kerry

  3. #3

    Default Re: Black walnut trees are beautiful, but...

    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry in Fort Sask, AB View Post
    Interesting. I've never seen a walnut 'au naturale' before. They look like apples (really bad apples ). Cool.

    Kerry
    Here's what they look like when you cut them open:

    IMG_0573 (Small).JPG

    These are black walnut as apposed to the common walnut. It's nut is smaller than the ones you get at the grocery store and they are much harder to get open. Tastes the same, but not really worth the effort, I just give them to my neighbor.



    They aren't too kind on lawn mower blades either

  4. #4

    Default Re: Black walnut trees are beautiful, but...

    Kerry,
    They would be the most awful apple to bite into. The husk smells as bad as the taste. The husk will also badly stain your hands. After they sit a short time they turn into black mush (dog poo). Personally black walnut taste nasty but English walnut are good.
    Grillzy

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Black walnut trees are beautiful, but...

    On the subject of black walnut. How do you get the stain they leave on a pressure treated deck after the squirls opened one and left it there in the rain and it left a dark stain.
    Thanks
    Bob just past Ayr www.thelavenderfarm.ca

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Black walnut trees are beautiful, but...

    Joseph: I know where you are coming from, I live on the original homestead. dating back to the 1840's. My great grandmother planted walnut around the house, God Bless her, but the work involved every fall is really a PITA. The trees are beautiful in leaf, but are the last to leaf out and the first to lose their leaves. Also the stains they leave on the patio, and the deck are also a bother. Also another problem is the juglone exuded by the roots, leaves, nut hulls, is extremely toxic to a lot of plants, so planting around the trees or within the drip line is limited, but grass seems to thrive under our walnuts.
    As an aside, on our farm there are black walnuts that are thriving and have been carefully pruned when young to grow straight limb free trunks , this is a practice that my grandfather started, and continued down to today. I can harvest some, but prefer to wait and let my daughters reap the benifits, as they will not reach their prime for another 30 yrs.
    Properly managed hardwood growth is as good money in the bank.
    Michael

  7. #7
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    just what you thought :^')

    Default Re: Black walnut trees are beautiful, but...

    We had Carpathian Walnuts in Europe, almost every other house and farm had one or more, they used to use the husks for making paint, and would come early to buy them from people that were willing to sell, as the husks were the best before they were fully mature.
    But most people would pick and eat them, harvesting was done with long sticks, so that the tree would have more short spurs where the nuts grow on.
    Those walnuts are much easier to break than the butter or black walnuts here, the fresh ones you could break with your hands, but us kids would open the door and place them by the hinge side and close the door some to get them to crack so we could eat the meat.
    On the real fresh ones you could even peel the very thin skin that's over the meat, and that would make them taste less bitter, as that skin is quite bitter by itself.

    A thousand or so years ago, someone brought some of those Carpathian Walnut nuts over to England, where they turned magically into English walnut .

    I've eaten some of the Black and butter nuts over here, and they do taste the same, but there's much less meat in them and they are hard to open up, so we don't bother much with that.
    We used bleach to clean our hands, as that was about the only thing that would do it, or just wear it off

    Have fun and take care
    Leo Van Der Loo

  8. #8

    Default Re: Black walnut trees are beautiful, but...

    Leo says he harvested with a stick, I just sat and waited for the green husk to open and the ripe nut drops to the ground. The Black walnut drops with the husk still firmly attached and often the husk is full of little white maggots. With the Carpathian/English/Spanish walnut squirrels are a real problem as they destroy the nuts before they are ripe. So a dog on a long rope is a real benefit backed up with a pellet gun for the run and take a leap khama-khazi squirrels

  9. #9

    Default Re: Black walnut trees are beautiful, but...

    Quote Originally Posted by Cayuga Kid View Post
    Also another problem is the juglone exuded by the roots, leaves, nut hulls, is extremely toxic to a lot of plants, so planting around the trees or within the drip line is limited, but grass seems to thrive under our walnuts.
    Their might be another benefit to the juglone. We used to have quite a few American Chestnuts, but they all got the Blight and had to be cut down. Only one survived, the one that is about 15 feet from a Black Walnut. Maybe it never caught the Blight because it is too busy fighting the juglone, who knows. It's about 40 feet tall and only 10" diameter at chest level, so it's basically a whip. It never produced any nuts either. I've been thinking about sacrificing the Walnut to see how the Chestnut would react.



    Quote Originally Posted by Cayuga Kid View Post
    . I can harvest some, but prefer to wait and let my daughters reap the benifits, as they will not reach their prime for another 30 yrs.
    Properly managed hardwood growth is as good money in the bank.
    Michael
    A guy I know hired some "under the table" loggers to cut down some fully mature centennial walnut trees he had on his property. He left them to it, and when he came back he found that the trees had been cut into 4' lengths, the loggers said "...the wood is no good, it's all black..."

    If you or your daughter hires someone, make sure they are competent.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Black walnut trees are beautiful, but...

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob just past Ayr View Post
    How do you get the stain they leave on a pressure treated deck after the squirls opened one and left it there in the rain and it left a dark stain.
    Bob!

    Did you try bleach, Hydrogen Peroxide or Oxalic Acid? You'll have to touch up the PT, but if you dilute some of that green stuff you paint the fresh cut ends with, it should be OK after a few weeks in the sun.

    Quote Originally Posted by Grillzy View Post
    The husk will also badly stain your hands.
    If one has the patience (and I don't after trying it once), a really nice wood stain can be made from the husks. Comes out a sort of purplish brown. But you gotta wear good neoprene gloves and plastic arm sleeves for the above reason!!! Much easier to buy from my MLC rep

    Paul

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Black walnut trees are beautiful, but...

    Thanks Paul I will give that a try.
    Bob just past Ayr www.thelavenderfarm.ca

  12. #12
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    just what you thought :^')

    Default Re: Black walnut trees are beautiful, but...

    Yes Pete that's done also, I know at places they would hang nets under the trees to catch the nuts, and they hung the nets so they would gather at one spot in the net where they would be collected, though that wasn't done with the one or two trees most people had, but by the commercial nut growers, like in France.
    Though the people that did sell the nuts for paint use they did use the sticks as the nuts where harvested early, and yes you would get more nut on the trees that way.

    Have fun and take care
    Leo Van Der Loo

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    Default Re: Black walnut trees are beautiful, but...

    Has anyone determined why some years you have a bumper crop and others much less?

  14. #14
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    Default Re: RE: bumper crops.

    Rick: you wonder why some years there are bumper crops of nuts, and other years not so plentiful. It all depends on the weather in the spring, when the tree is in flower a heavy killing frost will kill some or all of the flowers off, and hence no pollination will occur. I have noticed this happen with all types of trees, from mast producing trees, to fruit trees.
    Since different species of trees flower at different times, some early some late, it is hit or miss as to whether frost will get the flowers. Also location, trees at he bottom of hills in hollows as opposed to high ground, are more prone to a late killing frost. These are my observations over the years, also trees that are pollinated by bees ( fruit trees ) can be effected by cool weather as the bees are not as active. Trees such as Walnut, etc. are wind pollinated and do not depend on bees. Michael

  15. #15
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    Default Re: bumper crops.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cayuga Kid View Post
    Rick: you wonder why some years there are bumper crops of nuts, and other years not so plentiful. It all depends on the weather in the spring, when the tree is in flower a heavy killing frost will kill some or all of the flowers off, and hence no pollination will occur. I have noticed this happen with all types of trees, from mast producing trees, to fruit trees.
    Since different species of trees flower at different times, some early some late, it is hit or miss as to whether frost will get the flowers. Also location, trees at he bottom of hills in hollows as opposed to high ground, are more prone to a late killing frost. These are my observations over the years, also trees that are pollinated by bees ( fruit trees ) can be effected by cool weather as the bees are not as active. Trees such as Walnut, etc. are wind pollinated and do not depend on bees. Michael
    I don't recall seeing flowers on a walnut tree, but that doesn't mean they don't have them. I would rank this year as average for my trees, in terms of quantity of nuts. Some years there might be 2x this years crop. Keeps the squirrels busy burying them so i will have a new crop of seedlings come spring.

  16. #16
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    just what you thought :^')

    Default Re: bumper crops.

    The frost certainly has a lot to do with there being a crop or none at all in certain areas, but even with no frost to blame, it is natural for fluctuating crops, the thought of a good crop every other year was something I was brought up with, only with extra fertilizing and spraying against bugs and diseases do the commercial growers have bumper crops every year but for a killing frost.

    Have fun and take care
    Leo Van Der Loo

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