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Thread: 1941 Wadkin RM 26" jointer over 24" planner

  1. #21

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    Quote Originally Posted by North Woods Forman View Post
    Now that one above is over 400 HP! Nice jointer Jack, looking forward to seeing the rebuild pics. I really enjoyed the pics you posted back awhile ago on the wadkin table saw you rebuilt. Very nice.
    thanks

    jack
    English machines

  2. #22

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    here are some more pic that I think you will find intersting

    A grown man can not pick this motor up and I don't care how big you are. that's a tall boy can of beer for scale. I found this Wadkin motor with wadkin pulley's the right size for the head on the machines. this never happens. and the good part is it was free, so I have the head motor. I also got the electrics out of Daves Wadkin RM he is changing to single phase, so I have a starter for a 15hp motor, the PO's rig was a joke.



    the head is missing a bolt for the clam and some of the bolts don't look wadkin



    this a wadkin bolt it has a round head



    these are not but there is the same one on the there side for balance


    just so you can get a sence of the size of the jointer i put a tall beer on the table



    Now friend Arthuror Matty may be the only one that will appreciate these next pics

    the rack pinon handle is diffident from my older 16" RD its ARN with more webs. it could be use as a dating tool. so this machines is i would think after world war 2 when Britain had many aluminum foundry for the war effort.



    the wadkin head tool and the canting table



    jointer(planner) tables crank



    see next post

  3. #23

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    dirty papers(manual)



    notice the 25 hrzs


    jack
    English machines

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    Edmonton
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    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    Very cool!!
    Once you get a chance please post the picture of one of the blades. I really like to see how you get a skewed (single) blade on a jointer.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Unlisted, Ontario
    Posts
    5,837

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    Quote Originally Posted by jgarrett forsberg View Post
    notice the 25 hrzs

    jack
    English machines
    Wow... that's a first for me. What's the name plate rpm on the Wadkin motor you've got there Jack...? I'm assuming it's also rated for 25Hz power.

  6. #26

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    I had a 1954 Seybold-Harris 45" guillotine in the print shop with a converted 7.5 Hp 25 Hz motor. I think the changeover was '57.

  7. #27

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    love this machine! keep posting!
    Grillzy

  8. #28

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    I will in the next few days upload my progress on the wadkin. I hope you enjoy the rebuild. I have worked it piece mill and it is getting there. This has got to be the biggest machine i have ever work on.

    so far;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;

    I have pull the head out of the Wadkin RM and work the cutter block.
    There was a stud and plate bolt missing in the head and i did not like the looks of the others. The thing that got me the most was I needed a 48"cheater pipe to brake the nut free of the head,so they were way to tight.

    there is an old saying about moulding knife bolts::::
    if you turn nut over and it wont thread on the threads are stretched. Most are that way and so here is were i need help.

    the forged steel plate type cutterblock is really a great head with its skewed knifes and is also able to take moulding knifes. I did get the tool(spanner) for the head bolts that has short handle ,so i would think 60 to 100lbs is all that is need on the nuts.
    any care to comment?

    question
    is there a source for the studs , and what is the grade of metal/thread etc?
    the ones in there now appear to be mild steel.
    They BSW 5/8" by 11
    The plates are tapered and so the studs lengths are long on one side and get shorter as you go across.




    some pics

    here is the block with the missing bolt as i got the machine



    this nut does not look wadkin

    this is a Wadkin nut with the rounded top.


    wadkin RM 26" over under


    head removal







    nice bearing on this one
    2 RM 12 self aliening double rowed brass cage on the drive side with a 2308 SKF to the out board

    hand scraped bearing retainer cap.

    the head capless




    jack
    English machines

  9. #29

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    Matty a mate down under found this and i quote


    Quote Originally Posted by L.S.Barker1970
    Jack, back from a break so I had a little time to search through a copy of Wadkin's Tools and Accessories Catalog.
    Found this page with some steel specifications and sizes, Wadkin also go on to state on another page that the tensile strength of this specially selected heat treated alloy steel should be around 60 tons, oohee !

    Quote Originally Posted by tool613
    the forged steel plate type cutterblock is really a great head with its skewed knifes and is also able to take moulding knifes. I did get the tool(spanner) for the head bolts that has short handle ,so i would think 60 to 100lbs is all that is need on the nuts.
    any care to comment?
    Jack
    Jack did some tests tightening up bolts by hand and then checking them over with a torque wrench, got them to around 80 to 90 lbs and I was happy with that, any more and there is a chance of shortening the nut and bolts life more quickly, stretching treads etc.
    I would always tighten by hand to gain a good "Feel" for the tension applied, I would not just rely on a torque wrench alone, even one of those posh Warren and Brown numbers,
    I like to still check by hand and spanner, thats just me..
    My saw Doctor Friend definitely had a big box of those nuts with T head bolts, he's back on board in February if you can hang on till then Jack, pretty sure they were the right thread too.

    Melbourne Matty.

    got the head cleaned up and ready to store until i am ready to work the other parts.I wanted to clean the rust and look at the bearing any way. here are some pics of the workings of the wadkin plate/clam head

    here you can see that the cutter block is tapered on the sides the jointer knifes plates/clam go.



    the wadkin head has keyed jacking/ knife adjustment screws and you don't need the plates to to hold the knifes from slipping like the Oliver head. the stud hole is through the head and the stud bottom on a small rim on the top edge.


    a set of Wadkin spent knifes(no life left) with the key slot at the back on the blade. only half of the knifes are useful in this design. the blade are about 1 1/2" wide when new. You are still able to get theses from wadkin.


    i have found regular knifes placed in front of the key screw. this is very dangerous with this type head.

    you have a 12" section for moulding knifes in the jointer head and it does not upset the straight knifes.


    the hard wood side of the head is thinner than the softwood side of the head by about 5/8" this is what skews the knife.




    hope you enjoyed the view of the Wadkin Plate type head.



    jack
    English machines

  10. #30

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    there are two guards on a modern jointer. There is the stander pork chop/bridge and what I will call the back guard that covers the head when the fence is move over the table. Most old jointer don,t have the main and very little have a back guard.The wakin RM never had the back guard and so I made one.


    A safety guard has to do 3 things to be of any use.

    1 The most important is protect the operator from the cutter head.

    2 be easy to adjust and not be in the way of the machines function as it was designed to preform.

    3 be easy to remove for assess to the cutter head.

    it can than look good if you want .

    I have 26" of head to cover at any given time and I wanted to be able to adjust while the machine was running. Most back guards are attached to the fence and so I designed mine to do the same. I simply welded a simple rod and bracket that screwed in taped holes to the fence base for my guard to attach.

    Because the table slide in and out to open the cutter block for moulding my guard needed this adjustment as-well.

    I made it from aluminum and copper to keep it light but strong.




    adjustment for sliding in and out



    fully extended to 26"



    fence tip 45 drgs


    making progress on the motor too. but there are to many pic so see next post.


    jack
    English machines

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Unlisted, Ontario
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    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    It's about time you came back and updated this thread Jack....

    It was getting to the point where I was going to do it for you...lol

  12. #32

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    J
    In a few day I will have more than you have seen elsewhere posted here. I want to add to the OWWM ARN content here. I hope to show more the reason I like the old stuff. Hoping to get more to turn RUST JUNKIE and on to the path of enlightenment.



    The motor I got for the Wadkin RM is Not a Wadkin Motor. I needed a footed motor to drive the head and This 3 phase 5 HP baby should do a fine job of it. It is most likely off an old band saw based on the bearings . It's got open deep grooved ball bearing set in the bells. One great features to these type motors is the grease bled at the bottom so you can't over grease and the old grease stays out of the motor winding. This motor should last forever for what I am using it for. They say it is wise to change the bearing when you got things apart ,but I have had good luck determining if bearing are good or not by running and looking in side. So far I have only been off once. I must have saved $2000 so far in the rebuild once I started checking the bearing in stead of just changing them because they were old. Most if not all the bearing I am talking about were open . I have never found good old sealed bearing.

    the motor after a test run on power.


    theses bearing looked a sound great and pressure on the shaft had no play. I cleaned the old grease out that was in general good looking . It was not hard or soapafied.



    The fan end bell of the motor had a neat mesh grill to keep shaving out of the motor. It was neat but not up to what I wanted and thought it looked not all that great. It got filed away under G. I made my own at the drill press with some scrap sheet stock.more on that later.


    So really all and all the rebuilding of this Motor was just maintenance and was ready to go to work.

    For purely atheistic reasons I paint things at this point and like to add what i call an artistic licence. My restoration are what I think they should be and so I indulge myself. I find Machinery in it original state boring and drab and like to hot rod some things.If you like original look away









    The motor finished


































    jack
    English machines

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Edmonton
    Posts
    3,290

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    Your work is insanely clean and nice! Looking at your restoration thread is among the most fascinating tool magazines (including the new ones) I've seen.

  14. #34

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    Quote Originally Posted by mreza View Post
    Your work is insanely clean and nice! Looking at your restoration thread is among the most fascinating tool magazines (including the new ones) I've seen.
    thanks for the words of enjoyment. I do love theses old machines.


    The wadkin RM had some rust on it but everything moves,and I did not have time last winter to do any major work on it ;( When one gets a new toy it hard to leave them alone). I had been taking small parts off it this winter and working the machine peace meal.

    The bridge Guard is a UK design and there are differences over the American pork chop guard . i was very lucky to have this still with the machine. You thing pork chop guards are hard to find try finding a UK bridge guard? Any way the guard was riveted together and to clean it the old rivets had to come out. I made new ones with carage head bolts turned down.

    made a new handle and add spring load to the end plate . The chain for the counter wight is made of tin with bronzes pins. I just love how picky the Brits are/were.

    the counter wight was missing and i am using the one i made for my Band saw. it's filled with sand and this time i want to use lead Shot.


    Can you still get lead shot at the sport camping store/gun shop. I am not a hunter so I would not know. Does it cost a lot for say 5 lbs. Or are there any other sources for lead that are cheep?
    there will be an opening in the counter weight of about 3/4".


    the rusty RM


    cleaned






    new handle with spring load end





    bronze /tin chain for counter weight





    the home made counter that I would like to fill with shot and make smaller.



    jack
    English machines

  15. #35

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    You got to love machines that were made before plastic and tin/sheet metal was common.

    The control station is solid bronzes cast. Wadkin painted it gray and I just could not do it. looks like a traffic light don't ya think?


    out of practice on my lettering.LOL



    jack
    English machines[

  16. #36

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    i did find a Brooks feed motor for $30.




    i started working the bed and what to most people looks bad just needs a shave. For old rusted tables I like to give them a shave.I buy my straight raisers in boxes of 100. took about an hour.




    i pulled the bed rollers and checked the bearing. they were gone and because they are not to easily serviced I replaced them with rubber sealed SKF. $100.


    the serrated infeed and smooth outfeed and bed rollers went to a metal lathe to bring them back in spec. I know the guy so $30 but a proshop should only charge an hours labor.


    the blocks that hold the cutter head and rollers/ pressure bars are all cleaned up and the plain bearings for the rollers were in great shape. Steel in cast "ARN" with oil channels cut in the bearing like in Babbitt. there is a hole left from the hold downs spring rod that leaves a hole for the bearings oil and the ways are cut from there. should I and a piece of felt?



    bearing were gone on the motor and new sealed SKF $30 bearing were instaled. it look like a rewind had be done. If you have never experienced how smooth a 3 phase motors run watch the video.


    you tube
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UwIqo...1&feature=plcp

    jack
    English machines

  17. #37

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    Took the Presures Bars out of The Wadkin RM . The infeed side was worn in the middle as is always the case. I want to get this thing tuned in when I get it all painted . I like to do the machinery side of thing first. I find it easy to work the with the small parts and after all the mechanical is repaired i jump in and jackifie.

    the chip breaker and pressures bars on ether side of the Wadkin RM head





    starting with the chip breaker

    its was out about 3/32"

    made a simple sled for the disk sander



    milled chip breaker



    Video

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjP-5...vK2ZAWXA&index


    If you don't have a disk sander I bet it on your list now


    jack
    English machines

  18. #38

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    I'd post my true thoughts, on your project, but would probably be banned for the pornographic analogies. Let's just leave it at "I like what I see".

    Lead shot... another option is to melt down some used tire weights.

    I look forward to the day that I have the time.

    Thank you!

    Kev

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Real Name
    Ryan

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    Thanks for the update! Love the thread.
    Any more shots of the making of the guard? That would be cool to see how you did that.
    meanwhile, I like that guard, but the black star knob on the top seems a little out of place to me. Have you thought of some nice turned wood, maybe something like this?

    014-1.jpg

  20. #40

    Default Re: Dave (richwood furniture)save a Wadkin and get one too.

    Quote Originally Posted by callee View Post
    Thanks for the update! Love the thread.
    Any more shots of the making of the guard? That would be cool to see how you did that.
    meanwhile, I like that guard, but the black star knob on the top seems a little out of place to me. Have you thought of some nice turned wood, maybe something like this?

    014-1.jpg


    Callee when the machines are this big(3787lbs) you got to cut back some

    jack
    English machines

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