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Thread: Newbie staining Maple...

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    The method I described does not require spraying, or a completely dust free area, The danish oil is easy to apply, you could top coat with a variety of shiny finishes.
    “The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.” -Bertrand Russell

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    I'm not sure. Im getting all my stock from a trim shop in Barrie. I will ask when I go back for more.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    Quote Originally Posted by phil View Post
    The method I described does not require spraying, or a completely dust free area, The danish oil is easy to apply, you could top coat with a variety of shiny finishes.
    I have just done some reading on the Danish oil method. I am considering this for sure! We want to end up with a light brown, so we are hoping to avoid the amber tone. How many coats of Danish oil did your maple doors require? After the first coat, did you wet sand with Danish oil for every coat? Does wet sanding Danish oil on maple take a long time to fill the grain? I can't imagine it's as long as oak right?

    I'd love a picture!

  4. #24
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    Stan Otto

    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    EssaMike,

    Maple can be a tough wood to get an even color in my experience. I usually stay with a natural finish ( regardless of whether it is water or oil based) when using maple on a project unless a client really wants it a different color. Just thought I'd mention this so you aren't pulling your hair out thinking you're doing something wrong.

    I have used danish oil on a number of projects and have never tried the wet sanding method but have had good results with light sanding between thoroughly dry coats with 220-320 grit.

    stan

  5. #25
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    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    Thank you for the information. How many coats do you usually apply? Do you normally put any protective coating over top?

  6. #26
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    Martin

    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    Quote Originally Posted by EssaMike View Post
    Does wet sanding Danish oil on maple take a long time to fill the grain?
    Mike, Hard maple is not an open pore type of wood. There is no holes to be filled, like oak or walnut.


    Quote Originally Posted by EssaMike View Post
    How many coats do you usually apply? Do you normally put any protective coating over top?
    You don't need to put a top coat over danish oil. Danish oil is a blend of varnish, oil and mineral spirits.
    I like two coats, but you can put as many as you want, depending on how much protection you need.
    Last edited by Bidule; 06-06-2012 at 02:15 PM.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    My understanding is that Danish oil, while one of the easiest finishes, offers what they called "moderate" protection. Therefore topcoating is often used with preferred products being oil based. WB is doable but due to the nature of Danish oil, it needs to cure first, which can take a few weeks or more, depending on temperature and humidity.
    In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    Ok. Thank you to both of you. I think a read somewhere that either oil based top coat or water based will yellow over time. Is that true?

    I can't wait until tomorrow...took the rest of the week off and Im heading to lee valley tomorrow!!! First visit. Can't wait!

  9. #29
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    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    WB won't yellow that much, unless you get one of those that specifically mention ambering effect.

    I have a small table I made about 20 years ago. Nothing special and actually rather poor quality, except for the durable finish. It did yellow a little. The photo shows side by side :

    maple.jpg

    - 19 year old maple, clear Varathane WB poly, semi gloss, plenty of natural light exposure over the years
    - 1 year old bare maple, no finish, planed about a year ago and stored inside a scrap pile with minimal artificial light exposure

    Sorry about the quality, it's taken with a tablet, and just to give you a ballpark idea about the darkening over the years.
    In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion

  10. #30
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    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    I can live with that... Still looks pretty good!

  11. #31
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    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    My trip to Lee Valley went great. What a great store...I talked to a guy about Danish Oil. Very helpful people and they answered every question. No rush like a big box store! He recommended I try Tired and True Varnish Oil. They had a sample of the product on maple wood and it's exactly what we are going for. Had a semi-gloss finish too. I bought a can of it and a can of Tired an True Danish Oil.

    I'm in the process of doing a sample of the Varnish Oil now. First coat is on and the 2nd will go on in 24
    hours. Can't wait to see the end result...hopefully this it the one. So far I've spent about $150 on supplies on
    this topic. ;)

    My doors are a tad fancy and have a lot of grooves. The varish oil is a tad thick. Has anyone ever mixed it with Danish oil to make it a tad thinner?

  12. #32
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    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    you can thin the danish oil with turpentine if you happen to leave it on and it gets sticky. Usually i like to do a couple of coats over a day or two and a two or three more , leaving it a day or two in between. look at it this way the danish oil soaks in and hardens below the surface, inside the wood.
    If you want you can coat it again every few months , or year or so and the shine and depth will build, scratches and such will get covered up. it won't leave a hard shell like varnich, lacquer, shellac poly etc. You can use one of those finishes over top once you are happy with the look.
    I like it because I can see what my putty looks like, I am workign a lot on floors and trim. when the oil is on I can see the "finished" look, but can still adjust the color of any filler used, or fix any issues with glue spots etc.
    a hard casing over the finish will offer better water protection as it seals it in, but also makes it more difficult to work on the finish once applied, so I look at the oil as a preliminary step and often can leave it at that for time, the item having enough of a finish to be usable and presentable. you can experiment with other oils such as tung oil or linseed oil as well if you like. I find the combination brings out the grain and I like tha I can darken my project slowly in steps which helps to provide an even"stain" if I introduce some color after the initial coat. the reason I always use clear on the first coat is so that if it soaks into any porus areas or cracks, it fills them without loading those areas with pigment.
    if you want to spray the project later it can be nice to have a smooth finish already and to be away from the dust. you cn apply many finishes in less than perfect ( somewhat dusty) environment if you use wipe on techniques.
    when you are wiping on anythign you will have a tendency to push the product into the grain, when you spray a product on, really the only thing there to make the surface flat and shiny is it's tendency to flatten out due to surface tension. a thick coat of , say poly, will tend to flatten out due to the nature of the product but can leave an item with a plasticy look because you have basicly encased the project with a fairly thick shell. all these products have their place.
    Phil
    “The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.” -Bertrand Russell

  13. #33
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    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    Thank you for taking the time to give me detailed response. I have done a sample board using Tried and True Varnish Oil. It is a non toxic, linseed base product. It is slow drying as it contains no metal driers. I did 3 coats however the first 2 coats may have been way too thin. I applied it slightly more thick on the third coat. It's not exactly what we were originally going for, but we really like it. It really goes with the counter and backsplash we have picked out.

    Now I just need to decide if I'm going to apply a poly over top or not.

    Here is a pic against bare wood using scraps.


  14. #34
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    Essa
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    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    I have gotten most of my doors assembled now. They are a mitred door but some of the miters did not glue up as nice as I would have liked. Some doors have gaps in the miter joint. Can anyone give any tips on the best method to fill/match the gaps when using the varnish oil by Tried and True? I've have tried putting wood glue on the gap, wiping away the excess glue, then giving the joint a light sanding to fill the glued gap with the fine saw dust provided from the sanding. Easy enough but it came out lighter then the rest of the wood.

  15. #35
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    Mick

    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    On maple trim etc I quite often use Minwax Wood repair (wax) crayons for filling nail holes etc. I usually use the PINE colour as their Maple is very dark , take your finished scrap to the store with you for colour matching. LV , Rona , H.Depot , good paint store etc all sell them under one brand or another. NOTE dont use these before your finishing (poly/oil /whatever) is done as they are wax so finish wont stick to it. Once you have the holes filled buff out really hard with an old peice of Towel or sweat shirt , the heat friction pust a nice gloss on the wax to match your finish and gets any excess off the surface.....only $3-4 a crayon so worth a try i'd say.....

  16. #36
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    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    I'll give that a try. Thank you.

    I went to Lowes looking for those crayons but all I found was a stain marker. I tried the lightest one they had but it was too dark. I'll try home depot next for the crayons

  17. #37
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    Mick

    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    Dynamic is the other brand i use. The pens are good for scratches etc but not for filling. The glue you tried will also leave an area where stain/colour wont take if you decide you want to dye or something so I wouldnt use that method.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  18. #38
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    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    Mike,

    FYI regarding alcohol (for using with shellac). Last summer I had a bad experience with premixed shellac. It turned out it was old. It's probably true of most premixed shellac since it seems to be used only by woodworking types, whereas in general most people go for polyurethane. This means the shellac stays on the shelf quite a while and I hadn't thought of checking the date and sure enough it was past its "use by" date.

    At that moment I had decided I would mix my own the next time I used shellac. I started looking around for the elusive alcohol. After looking around quite a bit, I found that you can get 95% ethanol sold as rubbing alcohol compound at the pharmacy at Shoppers Drug Mart and Freshco, and probably several others. I believe it is still $2.17 for 1/2 litre. You do have to check the bottles they are often mixed up on the shelf. It's definitely more expensive than the methyl hydrate but way less harmful.

  19. #39
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    Default Re: Newbie staining Maple...

    If it's on the shelf and labelled rubbing alcohol then it's isopropyl alcohol (not ethanol) and is diluted with water and has other additives. Only place I know in GTA that sells genuine denatured alcohol off the shelf is Goudeys. There are probably others, but pharmacies and supermarkets sell isopropyl and hardware stores sell methanol.

    And while I'm replying to this thread...

    Quote Originally Posted by darius View Post
    I use long rubber gloves and I can't see how methanol can get through those but not through the bottle it is sold in. The mask, any good quality organic vapor mask, like 3M, is good enough. I understand safety and that's why I pointed out to the label warning, But there is a difference between staying safe and being paranoid.
    I wouldn't be surprised if we caused ourselves more harm through regular use of those smelly drier sheets than from an occasional use of methanol with safety precautions in mind.
    Not being paranoid just careful with very hazardous chemicals. I also think that those of us with experience in dealing with these should pass on the risks to the inexperienced rather than suggesting its Ok to use them as long as they read the label etc. Casual users seem not to read labels these days, especially if someone on the internet says it's OK.
    If you use the orange stripper gloves, methanol will pass through them, the black, stiff type offer more protection, but are a PITA. Not all organic carbon filters offer the same protection, they are designed for absorbing different chemicals/gasses. 3M makes several different types for different gasses. A specialised safety supply shop will stock the correct version for methanol.
    And you may well be correct about the dryer sheets, I have had reactions to them and we haven't used them for a very long time. Kinda hard to wear a respirator in bed LOL
    Paul

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